Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

1 CE Test Hour

Original Research

Antineoplastic Drug Administration by Pregnant and Nonpregnant Nurses

An Exploration of the Use of Protective Gloves and Gowns

Contrada, Emily

AJN The American Journal of Nursing: January 2019 - Volume 119 - Issue 1 - p 36
doi: 10.1097/01.NAJ.0000552584.07848.35
Feature Articles
Free
CE
Back to Top | Article Outline

TEST INSTRUCTIONS

  • Read the article. Take the test for this CE activity online at www.nursingcenter.com/ce/ajn.
  • You'll need to create and log in to your personal CE Planner account before taking online tests. Your planner will keep track of all your Lippincott Professional Development (LPD) online CE activities for you.
  • There is only one correct answer for each question. The passing score for this test is 13 correct answers. If you pass, you can print your certificate of earned contact hours and the answer key. If you fail, you have the option of taking the test again at no additional cost.
  • For questions, contact LPD: 1-800-787-8985.
  • Registration deadline is December 4, 2020.
Back to Top | Article Outline

PROVIDER ACCREDITATION

  • LPD will award 1 contact hour for this continuing nursing education (CNE) activity. LPD is accredited as a provider of CNE by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation.
  • This activity is also provider approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider Number CEP 11749 for 1 contact hour. LPD is also an approved provider of CNE by the District of Columbia, Georgia, and Florida #50-1223. Your certificate is valid in all states.
Back to Top | Article Outline

PAYMENT

  • The registration fee for this test is $12.95.
Back to Top | Article Outline

Antineoplastic Drug Administration by Pregnant and Nonpregnant Nurses: An Exploration of the Use of Protective Gloves and Gowns

GENERAL PURPOSE:

To present the details of a study conducted to assess glove and gown use by female pregnant and nonpregnant nurses in the United States and Canada who administer antineoplastic drugs.

Back to Top | Article Outline

LEARNING OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES:

After completing this continuing education activity, you should be able to

  • summarize the findings of the review of the literature.
  • discuss the authors’ findings and implications for practice.
  1. A recent review by Connor and colleagues indicated that health care workers with long-term, low-level occupational exposure to antineoplastic drugs seem to be at increased risk for adverse
    1. reproductive outcomes.
    2. respiratory outcomes.
    3. oncologic outcomes.
  2. All occupational health authorities in the United States and Canada recommend that health care workers who administer antineoplastic drugs should at least wear
    1. 1 pair of latex gloves.
    2. 1 pair of chemotherapy gloves.
    3. 2 pairs of chemotherapy or latex gloves.
  3. These authorities also recommend that, in addition to gloves, health care workers who administer antineoplastic drugs should wear a
    1. reusable cloth gown.
    2. nonabsorbent gown.
    3. disposable paper gown.
  4. In the authors’ study, of the nonpregnant nurses who reported having administered antineoplastic drugs within the past month, 24% had done so
    1. once every other week.
    2. once or twice per week.
    3. more than 3 times per week.
  5. How did glove and gown use compare between pregnant and nonpregnant nurses who had recently administered antineoplastic drugs?
    1. More pregnant than nonpregnant nurses reported always wearing gloves.
    2. More nonpregnant than pregnant nurses reported always wearing gowns.
    3. Consistent glove and gown use was about the same in both groups.
  6. Among the nonpregnant nurses who had administered chemotherapy recently and reported the mode of administration, which mode or modes was most common?
    1. infusion only
    2. pills only
    3. pills and infusion
  7. Among nonpregnant nurses, always wearing gloves was most common among those who reported administering antineoplastic drugs only
    1. in crushed pill form
    2. as intact pills.
    3. by infusion.
  8. Among pregnant nurses, what percentage reported having administered antineoplastic drugs during the first 20 weeks of pregnancy?
    1. 7%
    2. 16%
    3. 25%
  9. Of the pregnant nurses who had administered antineoplastic drugs during the first 20 weeks of pregnancy, what proportion reported not always wearing gloves when doing so?
    1. about 1 in 2
    2. about 1 in 5
    3. about 1 in 10
  10. In the same group, what proportion reported not always wearing a gown?
    1. about 1 in 2
    2. about 1 in 5
    3. about 1 in 10
  11. Of the nonpregnant nurses who had administered antineoplastic drugs within the past month, what proportion reported not using gloves when doing so?
    1. about 1 in 2
    2. about 1 in 5
    3. about 1 in 10
  12. In the same group, what proportion reported not using a gown?
    1. about 1 in 2
    2. about 1 in 5
    3. about 1 in 10
  13. In a study by Boiano and colleagues, 85% of nurses reported always wearing
    1. a nonabsorbent gown.
    2. 2 pairs of latex gloves.
    3. at least 1 pair of chemotherapy gloves.
  14. The U.S. Pharmacopeia's chapter on handling hazardous drugs in health care settings states that closed-system drug-transfer devices must be used as adjuncts for antineoplastic drug administration when
    1. the handlers are pregnant.
    2. the dosage form allows.
    3. drug dosages exceed minimal amounts.
  15. A study by Hon and colleagues used dermal wipe samples to check hospital workers for detectable amounts of a certain antineoplastic drug. The findings indicated that an important source of occupational exposure is
    1. workplace contamination.
    2. inadequate hand hygiene.
    3. improper administration.
  16. In the study by Boiano and colleagues, 12% of health care workers who administered antineoplastic drugs reported
    1. a recent antineoplastic drug spill.
    2. not knowing whether they'd taken home contaminated clothing.
    3. taking home clothing that had come into contact with these drugs.
  17. Boiano and colleagues also reported that the most common reason respondents gave for not wearing gloves when administering such drugs was
    1. “not part of our protocol.”
    2. “skin exposure was minimal.”
    3. “not provided by employer.”
Copyright © 2019 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.