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The Acute Effects of Nicotine on the Esophagus of Smokers and Non-Smokers

66

Thakore, Jigna, M.D.; Gopalswamy, N., M.D.; Brown, David, R.N.; Agrawal, Sangeeta, M.D.

American Journal of Gastroenterology: September 2005 - Volume 100 - Issue - p S45
Supplement Abstracts Submitted for the 70th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology: ESOPHAGUS
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Gastroenterology, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Dayton, OH and Gastroenterology, Wright State University, Dayton, OH.

Purpose: Cigarette smoking has been linked to a decrease in lower esophageal sphincter (LES) tone and an increase in gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. There have been no prospective studies comparing the effects of nicotine on the esophageal motility of smokers and non-smokers. We conducted a prospective study that measured baseline and post-nicotine LES pressure, LES relaxation, and esophageal body motility in chronic smokers and non-smokers.

Methods: Esophageal manometry using solid state catheter was performed at baseline and after a 14 mg transdermal nicotine patch on nine smokers and seven non-smokers. The baseline and post-nicotine LES pressure, lower esophageal residual pressure, distal esophageal amplitude, and percent peristalsis were compared within each group and between the two groups using Wilcoxon Signed Rank Sum Test.

Results: Among the smokers, there was no significant decrease in the lower LES tone and LES residual pressure after nicotine patch placement (1-tailed p = 0.84 and 1-tailed p = 0.45 respectively). The distal esophageal amplitude and percent peristalsis were also not significantly different before and after nicotine exposure among smokers (p = 1 and p = 1 respectively).

In the non-smokers, no significant decrease in LES tone and LES residual pressure was found after nicotine exposure (1-tailed p = 0.29 and 1-tailed p = 0.34 respectively). Also, there was no significant difference in the distal esophageal amplitude and percent peristalsis before and after nicotine patch placement (p = 0.289 and p = 0.5 respectively).

When comparing the smokers with non-smokers, baseline LES tone, LES residual pressure, distal esophageal amplitude, and percent peristalsis were not significantly different. These parameters did not change significantly after nicotine exposure in smokers compared to non-smokers.

Conclusions: Our study showed that nicotine had no statistically significant effect on the esophageal motility of smokers and non-smokers.

© The American College of Gastroenterology 2005. All Rights Reserved.