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The Association of Serum Lipids With Colorectal Adenomas

Yang, Moon Hee MD1, 8; Rampal, Sanjay MD, MPH2, 3, 8; Sung, Jidong MD1, 4; Choi, Yoon-Ho MD1, 4; Son, Hee Jung MD1, 4; Lee, Jun Haeng MD4; Kim, Young Ho MD4; Chang, Dong Kyung MD4; Rhee, Poong-Lyul MD4; Kim, Jae J MD4; Rhee, Jong Chul MD4; Chun, Ho-Kyung MD5; Guallar, Eliseo MD, DrPH3, 6; Cho, Juhee PhD3, 7

American Journal of Gastroenterology: May 2013 - Volume 108 - Issue 5 - p 833–841
doi: 10.1038/ajg.2013.64
Colon/Small Bowel
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OBJECTIVES: There is suggestive but sparse evidence that dyslipidemia is associated with colorectal neoplasms. We investigated the association of serum lipid and apolipoprotein concentrations with the prevalence of colorectal adenomas.

METHODS: Cross-sectional study of 19,281 consecutive participants aged 40–79 years undergoing screening colonoscopy at the Center for Health Promotion of the Samsung Medical Center in Korea from January 2006 to June 2009.

RESULTS: We identified 5,958 participants with colorectal adenomas (30.9%), including 5,504 (28.5%) with non-advanced adenomas and 454 (2.4%) with advanced adenomas. The adjusted relative prevalence ratios (aRPRs) comparing the fourth with the first quartiles of serum triglycerides were 1.35 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.20–1.52;Ptrend<0.001) for non-advanced adenomas and 1.45 (95% CI 1.02–2.06;Ptrend=0.005) for advanced adenomas. Higher levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol and apolipoprotein A-1 (ApoA-1) were significantly associated with 12% (Q4 vs. Q1 aRPR 1.12; 95% CI 1.00–1.26;Ptrend=0.049) and 17% (Q4 vs. Q1 aRPR 1.17; 95% CI 1.04–1.31;Ptrend=0.004) higher prevalence of non-advanced adenoma. There was also a non-significant association between higher levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (Q4 vs. Q1 aRPR 1.22; 95% CI 0.91–1.66;Ptrend= 0.12) and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) (Q4 vs. Q1 aRPR 1.32; 95% CI 0.94–1.83;Ptrend=0.07) with higher prevalence of advanced adenoma. There was no association between total cholesterol levels with colorectal adenoma.

CONCLUSIONS: In this large cross-sectional study, higher levels of serum triglycerides were significantly associated with an increasing prevalence of both non-advanced and advanced colorectal adenomas, while higher levels of ApoA-1 and HDL cholesterol were significantly associated with an increasing prevalence of non-advanced adenomas.

1 Center for Health Promotion, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

2 Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Julius Centre University of Malaya, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

3 Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

4 Department of Internal Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

5 Department of Surgery, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea

6 Department of Medicine and Welch Center for Prevention, Epidemiology, and Clinical Research, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

7 Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, Seoul, Korea

Correspondence: Juhee Cho, PhD, Department of Health Sciences and Technology, Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology, Sungkyunkwan University, 50, Gangnam-Gu, Seoul 135-710, Korea. E-mail: jcho@SKKU.edu

8 These authors contributed equally as first authors of the paper.

Received 16 October 2012; accepted 20 February 2013

published online 2 April 2013

© The American College of Gastroenterology 2013. All Rights Reserved.
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