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Outcome of hepatitis C patients with and without hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing liver transplant

Min, Albert D, MD1,*; Saxena, Romil, MD2; Thung, Swan N, MD2; Atillasoy, Evren O, MD1; Wolf, David C, MD1; Sauter, Bernhard, MD1; Schwartz, Myron E, MD3; Bodenheimer, Henry C Jr, MD1

American Journal of Gastroenterology: November 1998 - Volume 93 - Issue 11 - p 2148–2153
doi: 10.1111/j.1572-0241.1998.00611.x
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Objective: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The aim of this study was to examine clinical characteristics and outcome of patients with HCV with or without HCC undergoing liver transplant.

Methods: We reviewed the charts of all 55 patients transplanted between November 1990 and December 1996 for HCV cirrhosis with HCC and compared them with a control group of HCV patients without HCC. Patients with a history of alcohol abuse or HBsAg positivity were excluded. There were 37 men and 18 women, with a mean age of 57.6 yr (range, 19–70 yr) in the HCC group.

Results: There was no significant difference between the HCC and nonHCC groups regarding Child's class or United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) status at the time of transplant. Twenty-six (45%) patients were diagnosed or suspected of having HCC before transplant. Twenty-five patients (45.5%) had a single focus of HCC. Fourteen percent (seven of 50) of the patients with HCC had been treated with interferon, whereas 12% (six of 52) of patients in the nonHCC group had received interferon. Duration of interferon therapy ranged from 1 to 9 months. All interferon treatment occurred within 5 yr of transplant. A history of intravenous drug use or transfusion was identified in 37 (67%) of HCC patients. Thirty-two patients (58%) without HCC had a parenteral exposure. There was no significant difference in patient or graft survival rates between the patients with and without HCC.

Conclusion: Approximately one-half of HCC was not detected before liver transplant. There was no significant difference in the mode of transmission, clinical status at the time of transplant, or outcome between the HCV patients with and without HCC.

1Division of Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, USA

2Department of Pathology, The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, USA

3Division of Abdominal Organ Transplantation, Department of Surgery, The Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York, USA

*Division of Liver Diseases, Department of Medicine, The Mount Sinai Medical Center, Box 1633, One Gustave L. Levy Place, New York, NY 10029

© The American College of Gastroenterology 1998. All Rights Reserved.
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