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Orbital Floor Fractures

Ramponi, Denise R. DNP, FNP-C, ENP-BC, FAEN, FAANP, CEN; Astorino, Terri DEd, RN; Bessetti-Barrett, Colleen R. DNP, FNP-BC

Section Editor(s): Ramponi, Denise R. DNP, FNP-C, ENP-BC, FAEN, FAANP, CEN; Column Editor

doi: 10.1097/TME.0000000000000163
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The orbital bones are thin and exposed, making the orbital walls vulnerable to fractures. The floor of the orbit is the weakest portion of this 4-sided pyramid structure. Blunt force trauma is the primary mechanism of injury in young men between the ages of 18 and 30 years. Computerized tomography is the primary imaging technique to diagnose orbital fractures. Conservative versus surgical management is determined by maxillofacial and ophthalmology specialists.

School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Moon Township, Pennsylvania (Dr Ramponi); and Department of Nursing, Edinboro University, Edinboro, Pennsylvania (Drs Astorino and Bessetti-Barrett).

Corresponding Author: Denise R. Ramponi, DNP, FNP-C, ENP-BC, FAEN, FAANP, CEN, School of Nursing and Health Sciences, Robert Morris University, Scaife Hall, 6001 University Blvd, Moon Township, PA 15108 (dramponi@comcast.net).

Illustrations by Katherine Chemsak, Media Arts Student, Robert Norris University.

Disclosure: The authors report no conflicts of interest.

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