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Drug-induced Sialorrhoea

Haastrup, Maija Bruuna,b,c; Henriksen, Daniel P.b,d; Christensen, Mette Marie H.b,d,e

doi: 10.1097/FAD.0000000000000037
Invited Review Article

Summary Sialorrhoea is a common adverse effect of a range of medicines, primarily clozapine. At least a third of patients treated with clozapine suffer from sialorrhoea, and the consequences of this can be socially stigmatising and lead to non-adherence. The treatment options are limited and primarily centered around muscarinic antagonism. We suggest non-pharmacological interventions followed by locally applied atropine or glycopyrrolate. If systemic treatment is necessary, amisulpride, benztropine, or terazosin may be attempted.

aClinical Pharmacology and Pharmacy, Department of Public Health, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

bDepartment of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Odense University Hospital, Odense, Denmark

cPsychiatric Drug Information, Region of Southern Denmark, Vejle, Denmark

dDepartment of Clinical Research, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark

eHospital Pharmacy, Hospital of South West Denmark, Esbjerg, Denmark

Correspondence to Maija Bruun Haastrup, Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology, Odense University Hospital, J B Winsløws Vej 19, 5000 Odense, Denmark. E-mail: mhaastrup@health.sdu.dk

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