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Development and Validation of the Beliefs About Personal Weight Survey Among African American Women

Pickett, Stephanie PhD, RN; Peters, Rosalind M. PhD, RN, FAAN; Templin, Thomas PhD

doi: 10.1097/ANS.0000000000000155
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The purpose of this study was to develop the Beliefs about Personal Weight Survey among African American women. Sixty-five items were developed from literature and sample participants to characterize beliefs about personal weight in 3 domains: descriptors, causes, and consequences. The items were administered to 150 community-dwelling African American women, 18 to 40 years old, recruited from 5 sites. Factor analysis supported a 4-factor solution with the following dimensions: overweight acceptance, overweight concern, conventional weight regulation, and circumstantial weight regulation. These factors were significantly associated with weight management behaviors and body mass index. Profile analysis indicated distinct factor belief profiles by 3 weight categories.

The purpose of this study was to develop the Beliefs about Personal Weight Survey among African American women. Factor analysis supported a four-factor solution with the following dimensions–Overweight Acceptance, Overweight Concern, Conventional Weight Regulation, and Circumstantial Weight Regulation. These factors were significantly associated with weight management behaviors and BMI. Profile analysis indicated distinct factor belief profiles by three weight categories. www.advancesinnursingscience.com

School of Nursing, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro (Dr Pickett); and College of Nursing, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (Drs Peters and Templin).

Correspondence: Stephanie Pickett, PhD, RN, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, School of Nursing, PO Box 26170, Greensboro, NC 27402 (s_picke2@uncg.edu).

This study was supported by the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, Lambda Chapter Research Grant Award, and the Wayne State University College of Nursing and Graduate School Dissertation Research Support.

Manuscript preparation partially funded by NIMHD P20MD002289 (PI: Wallace).

The authors declare no conflict of interest.

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