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Between the Lines

Generating Good Qualitative Data in Studies Involving Persons With Aphasia

Bronken, Berit Arnesveen, MNS; Kirkevold, Marit, EdD

doi: 10.1097/ANS.0b013e318290200a
Original Articles
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High-quality data are essential for developing knowledge in qualitative inquiries. Language impairments affect the ability to meet the requirements that constitute good qualitative data. In this article, we focus on generating good qualitative data in persons with aphasia following stroke. We drew on experiences from a longitudinal nursing intervention to discuss how to maximize data generation in accordance with norms for data quality in this population. The longitudinal design, using a combination of research methods, and the iterative process of data generation and analysis over time constituted a continuity that enhanced communication, mutual understanding, and a trustful partnership.

This article focuses on experiences from a longitudinal nursing intervention to discuss how to maximize data generation in accordance with norms for data quality in persons with aphasia following stroke. The longitudinal design, using a combination of research methods, and the iterative process of data generation and analysis over time constituted a continuity that enhanced communication, mutual understanding, and a trustful partnership. www.advancesinnursingscience.com

University of Oslo/Hedmark University College, Norway (Ms Bronken); and University of Oslo, Norway/University of Aarhus, Denmark (Dr Kirkevold).

Correspondence: Berit Arnesveen Bronken, MNS, University of Oslo, PO Box 1130, Blindern, N-0318 Oslo, Norway (b.a.bronken@medisin.uio.no).

The authors thank the participants with aphasia, health care professions, and experts for invaluable contribution to the study. The authors received grants from the Norwegian Extra Foundation for Health and Rehabilitation (the Norwegian Aphasia Association) and Norwegian Women's Public Health Association. In addition, the study was supported by the University of Oslo and Hedmark University College.

The authors declared no conflicts of interest with respect to the authorship of this article.

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