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Annual Meeting Abstracts: B-30 – Free Communication/Poster: Weight Loss

Effect of a Short-term Diet and Exercise Intervention on Serum Insulin, Lipids, Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Adhesion Molecules in Children

Chen, Andrew; Roberts, Christian; Barnard, R. James FACSM

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Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 2004 - Volume 36 - Issue 5 - p S82
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Autopsy studies indicate that development of atherosclerosis begins as early as the first decade of life in humans. Consequently, lifestyle changes may mitigate the progression of atherogenesis early in life. PURPOSE: To determine the effects of a structured diet and exercise program on biomarkers that accompany the development of atherosclerosis in children and adolescents. METHODS: Boys and girls of varying levels of fitness and adiposity (n = 10, age 12.2 ± 1.9 years) were placed on a high- fiber, low-fat, low-cholesterol diet at the Pritikin 2-week residential program where food was provided ad libitum and daily aerobic exercise was performed. Fasting levels of insulin, 8-isoprostane PGF2α (8-iso-PGF2α), C-reactive protein (CRP), and E-selectin were determined by enzyme immunoassays. Additionally, fasting lipids were measured in serum using automated enzymatic procedures. RESULTS: After the 2-week program, significant reductions in total cholesterol (117 ± 5.6 vs. 164 ± 12 mg/dL, p<0.01), LDL (79.2 ± 6.9 vs. 124 ± 12 mg/dL, p<0.01), triglycerides (80.8 ± 11 vs. 141 ± 28 mg/dL, p<0.01), total cholesterol: HDL (3.24 ± 0.39 vs. 4.22 ± 0.39, p<0.01), CRP (1.90 ± 0.62 vs. 4.15 ± 1.1 mg/L, p<0.05), E-selectin (3.49 ± 0.21 vs. 4.65 ± 0.34 ng/mL, p<0.01), and 8-iso-PGF2α (3.15 ± 1.3 vs. 7.84 ± 2.2 pg/mL, p<0.05) were observed. Although insulin decreased 31% on average, this reduction did not achieve statistical significance (15.5 ± 1.9 vs. 22.6 ± 4.5 μU/mL, p = 0.1). No change in HDL was noted (38.2 ± 2.8 vs. 39.9 ± 2.3 mg/dL). A significant decrease in BMI (28.2 ± 2.8 vs. 29.7 ± 2.9 kg/m2, p<0.01) was also noted. CONCLUSION: A rigorous diet and exercise regimen can induce beneficial changes in risk factors for atherosclerosis, even in young individuals without documented atherosclerosis.

©2004The American College of Sports Medicine