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F-54 Free Communication/Poster - Cardiorespiratory Responses to Acute Exercise Friday, June 2, 2017, 1: 00 PM - 6: 00 PM Room: Hall F

The Acute Cardiorespiratory Responses to High versus Low Volume Interval Cycling Exercise in Healthy Adults

3202 Board #107 June 2 2

00 PM - 3

30 PM

Scott, Andrew; Kidd, Danielle; Lawson, Jodie

Author Information
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 2017 - Volume 49 - Issue 5S - p 907
doi: 10.1249/01.mss.0000519466.84101.0f
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PURPOSE: High intensity interval training (IT) is an increasingly popular exercise mode with possible health risks and benefits. Therefore the purpose was to compare acute responses to two volumes of IT in healthy untrained males.

METHODS: Ten males (aged 19.5 ± 1.13 years) completed two IT trials on a cycle ergometer in a counter-balanced repeated measures study, at least 48 hours apart. Low volume (LVIT) consisted of three 20 s sprints (3x20) at self-selected maximal cadence with 7% of body mass as resistance and 160 s active rest. High volume (HVIT) consisted of ten 60 s sprints (10x60) at self-selected maximal cadence with 3.5% of body mass as resistance and 60 s active rest. Oxygen uptake (VO2), heart rate (HR) and power (W) were recorded continuously. In addition to these measures blood lactate [La-] and systolic blood pressure (SBP) were recorded pre, post and every ten minutes post-exercise for 30 minutes. Oxygen pulse (O2pulse), % predicted peak heart rate (%HRpeak), elevated post-exercise oxygen consumption (EPOC), energy expenditure (EE), fatigue index and rate-pressure product (RPP) were calculated. Repeated measures ANOVA and effect sizes were applied.

RESULTS: 10x60 caused a significantly greater VO2 (1548 ± 708 mL[BULLET OPERATOR]kg-1[BULLET OPERATOR]min-1 vs 1155 ± 476 mL[BULLET OPERATOR]kg-1[BULLET OPERATOR]min-1; p<0.001), O2pulse (9.6 ± 5.5 mL[BULLET OPERATOR]beat[BULLET OPERATOR]min-1, vs 7.5 ± 3.3 mL[BULLET OPERATOR]beat[BULLET OPERATOR]min-1; p<0.001), %HRpeak, (95 ± 4% vs 91 ± 5%; p=0.010), EPOC magnitude (35.3 ± 5.8 L vs 28.3 ± 7.1 L; p=0.018) and EE (500 ± 53 kcal vs 235 ± 29 kcal; p<0.001) than 3x20. EPOC duration was not significantly different (10x60: 16.51 ± 12.32 minutes vs 3x20: 10.84 ± 6.19 minutes; p=0.140). There were no significant differences in mean SBP (10x60: 136.3 ± 2.6 mmHg vs 3x20: 134.6 ± 2.4 mmHg; p>0.050) or RPP 10x60: 16179 ± 462 vs 3x20: 15957 ± 481; p=0.668) between trials, however there was a clinically significant reduction in SBP 30 minutes following 3x20 (122 ± 15 mmHg) compared to pre-exercise (135 ± 8 mmHg) (p=0.053, d=1.10), but not following 10x60 (pre 131 ± 12 mmHg; post 126 ± 9 mmHg; p=0.303). 3x20 caused significantly greater fatigue index (36.5 ± 11.3% vs 23.0 ± 10.1%; p=0.009) and [La-] (11.56 ± 2.13 mmol[BULLET OPERATOR]L-1 vs 7.79 ± 2.47 mmol[BULLET OPERATOR]L-1; p=0.010; d=1.63) 10 minutes post exercise.

CONCLUSIONS: 10x60 elicited significantly greater cardiorespiratory responses, whereas 3x20 produced a greater [La-] and fatigue index.

© 2017 American College of Sports Medicine