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C-22 Free Communication/Poster - Ergogenic Aids and Supplements: JUNE 3, 2010 7: 30 AM - 12: 30 PM: ROOM: Hall C

The Effects of a Commercially Available Energy Drink on Resistance Training Performance

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Board #58 June 3 8:00 AM - 9:30 AM

Campbell, Bill I.1; Downing, Jay1; Kilpatrick, Marcus1; Bounty, Paul La2; Elkins, Ava1; Williams, Sean1; dos Santos, Maria Gisele3; Chang, Terence1; Willey, Sean1; Kreider, Richard FACSM4

Author Information
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 2010 - Volume 42 - Issue 5 - p 448
doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000385012.35298.36
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PURPOSE: To determine the effects of a caffeine-containing, commercially available energy drink on resistance training performance.

METHODS: In a randomized (order of beverage), double blind, placebo controlled cross-over design, 18 recreationally active subjects (22 ± 2.9yrs; 175 ± 10cm; 76.5 ± 18.3kg) ingested a commercially available energy drink (containing 160mg of caffeine) or a placebo beverage that was matched for carbohydrate content and was similar in volume and texture. Forty-five minutes following ingestion of the energy drink or carbohydrate placebo, each participant engaged in a resistance exercise bout consisting of 4 sets of bench press and 4 sets of leg press at an intensity of 80% 1RM to failure on each set. The leg press and bench press sets were alternated and a rest period of approximately 2 minutes was utilized between each set. Bench press total lifting volume, leg press total lifting volume, and whole body total lifting volume was analyzed via a paired samples t-test using SPSS for Windows 15.0.

RESULTS: Data are reported as means ± standard deviation. Bench press total lifting volume for the energy drink condition and carbohydrate placebo condition was 1,873.1 ± 981 and 1,873.6 ± 877 kgs, respectively. Paired samples t-test revealed that there were no significant differences between the two groups (t(17) =.009, p =.993). Leg press total lifting volume for the energy drink condition and carbohydrate placebo condition was 10,261 ± 5,543 and 9,003 ± 5,070 kgs, respectively. Paired samples t-test revealed that there was a significant difference between the two groups (t(17) = -2.862, p =.011). Total lifting volume for the energy drink condition and carbohydrate placebo condition was 12,134 ± 6,257 and 10,877 ± 5,642 kgs, respectively. Paired samples t-test revealed that there was a significant differences between the two groups (t(17) = -2.709, p =.015).

CONCLUSION: A commercially available energy drink containing 160mg of caffeine significantly increases the total lifting volume of 4 sets of a leg press exercise at an intensity of 80%1RM with each set performed to failure but does not elicit an ergogenic effect on upper body total lifting volume as measured by 4 sets of the bench press at 80%1RM with each set performed to failure.

© 2010 American College of Sports Medicine