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Vibration, Split Stretching, And Static Vertical Jump Performance In Young Male Gymnasts: 1641Board #243 May 27 9:30 AM - 11:00 AM

Sands, William A. FACSM; McNeal, Jeni R.; Stone, Michael H.

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 2009 - Volume 41 - Issue 5 - p 80
doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000354806.00572.5d
A-37 Free Communication/Poster - Whole Body Vibration and Performance: MAY 27, 2009 7:30 AM - 12:30 PM ROOM: Hall 4F
Free

1U.S. Olympic Committee, Colorado Springs, CO.2Eastern Washington Univ, Cheney, WA.3East Tennessee State Univ, Johnson City, TN.

Email: bill.sands@usoc.org

(No relationships reported)

Low frequency vibration has been shown to dramatically improve split range of motion (ROM) and to enhance vertical jumping ability.

PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of vibration and stretching-induced increases in ROM on subsequent single-leg static vertical jump (SLSVJ) performance.

METHODS: Fifteen male gymnasts [11.1(2.1) yr, 144.3(15.6) cm, 36.5(12.2) kg] participated. All tests were randomized for tests and treatment condition. Pretests consisted of two SLSVJ trials on each leg from 90 deg knee flexion on a force platform. Then two trials of a forward split test were conducted on each leg. In the split test the rear leg was flexed vertically 90 deg at the knee to limit pelvic misalignment. The anterior superior iliac spine (ASIS) was palpated with height from the floor measured as the ROM criterion variable. Both sides forward splits were treated by vibration on a custom device (30 Hz, 2mm displacement) for one minute (10s stretch, 5s rest, four times). The vibration device was placed under the forward ankle and under the rear thigh in each treatment. In the experimental condition the vibration device was turned on (V) while in the control condition the device was turned off (NV). Following vibration treatment, the gymnasts repeated the split tests and the SLSVJ tests. Analysis consisted of multiple 2×2 ANOVAs with repeated measures of splits ROM, allometrically scaled SLSVJ variables, and descriptive statistics.

RESULTS: There was a greater improvement in split ROM in the V [29.4 (6.6) cm pre, 23.4 (6.2) cm post] vs NV [27.7 (7.3) cm pre, 25.0 (5.8) cm post] splits (P=0.002), however all SLSVJ variables showed a decrease pre-post (P<0.05) with no effect of condition and no significant interaction V by NV (all P>0.05).

CONCLUSION: Vibration-enhanced stretching improved split ROM but did not show a protective effect nor enhancement of subsequent SLSVJ performance.

© 2009 American College of Sports Medicine