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The Effect Of Climbing Experience On Metabolic Responses To Graded Exercise Tests Performed On A "Treadwall", Treadmill, And Cycle Ergometer: 2176Board #64 May 28 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

Wickwire, Jason; McLester, John FACSM; Harrison, Brenda

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 2009 - Volume 41 - Issue 5 - p 257-258
doi: 10.1249/01.MSS.0000355341.16729.82
D-28 Free Communication/Poster - Fitness Testing: MAY 28, 2009 1:00 PM - 6:00 PM ROOM: Hall 4F
Free

1Kennesaw State University, Kennesaw, GA. 2Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT.

Email: wickwire@kennesaw.edu

(No relationships reported)

Evidence suggests that subjects will achieve an ∼16% lower VO2 during a GXT performed on a cycle ergometer (CE) and a vertical treadmill {treadwall (TW)} as compared to a treadmill (TM). However, there appears to be no data comparing the same parameters between experienced (Ex) and nonexperienced (NEx) climbers.

PURPOSE: To compare metabolic data between Ex and NEx subjects that performed GXT's on a TM, CE, and a TW.

METHODS: NEx {n=22 (11 males & 11 females); 24.0 ± 3.5yrs; 170.8 ± 12.4cm; 69.7 ± 14.0kg; 19.1 ± 7.5%bf} and Ex {n=8 (7 males & 1 female); 28.0 ± 8.7yrs; 175.8 ± 5.4cm; 67.9 ± 10.3kg; 8.6 ± 4.6%bf} subjects were tested on the different ergometers on separate days to determine their highest achievable VO2 (order counterbalanced). VO2, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and heart rate (HR) were measured, along with several metabolic parameters.

RESULTS: A significant difference (p<0.05) was found between groups (Ex vs. NEx) for VO2 on the TM, CE, and TW, but not for RER or HR on any ergometer. With Ex and NEx grouped separately, a significant main effect was found between all ergometers for VO2, RER, and HR. A significant difference was found for VO2 between TM (Ex = 52.1 + 6.0; NEx = 42.9 + 4.6) and CE (Ex = 48.0 + 4.4; NEx = 35.9 + 4.9) and between TM and TW (Ex = 45.3 + 6.1; NEx = 36.2 + 4.1) in both the Ex and NEx groups. There was also a significant difference found for RER between TM (Ex = 1.11 + 0.08; NEx = 1.10 + 0.04) and CE (Ex = 1.19 + 0.08; NEx = 1.19 + 0.06), between TM and TW (Ex = 1.01 + 0.05; NEx = 1.05 + 0.06), and between CE and TW in both the Ex and NEx groups. Lastly, a significant difference was found for HR between TM (195.1 + 7.2) and CE (183.3 + 10.1) and between TM and TW (180.6 + 7.7) in the NEx group. However, in the Ex group the only significant difference found for HR was between TM (186.6 + 15.9) and TW (175.8 + 17.7).

CONCLUSION: There was found to be a 7.9% difference between TM and CE for VO2 in Ex. However, the difference in VO2 between TM and CE was 16.3% in NEx. The percentage difference for VO2 was more similar for the Ex and NEx groups between TM and TW (13.1% and 15.6% respectively), which suggests regardless of climbing experience subjects performing a GXT on a TW will hit a ceiling in VO2 at approximately the same point relative to their aerobic fitness.

© 2009 American College of Sports Medicine