Dietary Cholesterol Alters Recovery from Eccentric Muscle Damage in Humans: 2172: Board #109 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM : Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

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Dietary Cholesterol Alters Recovery from Eccentric Muscle Damage in Humans

2172

Board #109 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Riechman, Steven; Kean, David; Andrews, Ryan D.; Gasier, Heath; Hammer, Steven

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Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise 38(5):p S386, May 2006.
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PURPOSE: We have previously shown that dietary cholesterol was directly associated to lean mass gain in response to resistance training. Additionally, blood cholesterol is significantly reduced as soon as 2 hours and for as long as 48 hours after an eccentric muscle challenge suggesting an efflux of cholesterol, possibly to skeletal muscle to aid in repair and recovery.

METHODS: To test the hypothesis that dietary cholesterol would aid in the recovery from eccentric muscle damage, eight young men (mean age=21) performed two high intensity eccentric trial separated by four weeks under conditions of highly restricted dietary cholesterol (< 200 mg/day). Using a counterbalanced design, subjects were supplemented with dietary cholesterol (whole egg) for one trial and egg white on the other. Strength and perceived soreness were determined at 24, 48, and 72 hours after each trial.

RESULTS: Strength loss was significantly greater in the cholesterol supplemented trial that was consistent with the significantly greater perceived soreness. Subjects who were supplemented with cholesterol first returned to the second trial with significantly greater strength at baseline and lower perceived soreness throughout the second trial. Those supplemented with egg white first returned to the second trial with significantly lower strength.

CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that dietary cholesterol increases the magnitude of muscle injury responses during initial exposure to eccentric exercise but may enhance long term recovery.

© 2006 American College of Sports Medicine