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A-25D FREE COMMUNICATION/SLIDE PSYCHOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF INJURY

PSYCHOLOGICAL REACTIONS TO INJURY IN KOREAN SOCCER PLAYERS

Park, Mia1; Na, Young-Moo1; Lim, Kil-Byung1; Lee, Hong-Jae1

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Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 2003 - Volume 35 - Issue 5 - p S50
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PURPOSE

The purpose of this study was to identify Korean soccer players; psychological reactions to injury that may influence on rehabilitation program and its planning.

METHODS

The subjects were 164 soccer players ages from 17 to 24 years (M = 20) who were in rehabilitation program in Department of Rehabilitation Medicine. They were e5xamined by SCT (Sentence Completion Test) and self-report interview during their rehabilitation. SCT was designed to identify attitudes and views about themselves, others and the world. In the self-report interview, they stated their demographics and then asked to list both negative and positive aspects related to injury. The SCT and self-report interview were content analyzed.

RESULTS

Through content analysis, most common psychological reactions were categorized by four aspects; physical, career, emotional, and team aspects. Physical aspects included pain complaint (81 %), fear of re-injury (77%), and potential permanent physical changes (17%), team aspects included threats to be rejected from team (62%), guilty feeling for coaching staff and team (22%), and separation from teammates (35%), emotional aspects included anger to himself/herself (56%), guilty feeling for parents (58%) and loss of confidence (21%), and career aspects included threats to future performance in team (55%) and career change (49%).

CONCLUSION

Korean soccer players reacted to injury mostly in physical and team aspects. Top three psychological reactions were pain complaint fear of re-injury, and threats to be rejected from team. Team oriented psychological reaction to injury of Korean soccer players has important implications for implementing rehabilitation programs.

©2003The American College of Sports Medicine