Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

COMPARISON BETWEEN STATIONARY AND MOVING HANDLEBAR USE DURING FORWARD AND BACKWARD PEDALING ON AN ELLIPTICAL TRAINER

Hajiefermides, G1; Michael, T1; Zabik, R1; Liu, Y1; Dawson, M1; Carl, D1

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 2003 - Volume 35 - Issue 5 - p S192
D-14Q FREE COMMUNICATION/POSTER VALIDITY: INSTRUMENTATION AND EQUATIONS
Free

1Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, Michigan

Back to Top | Article Outline

PURPOSE

To determine if the use of moving handlebars have an effect on the physiological and perceptual responses during forward (FR) or backward (BK) motion on the elliptical trainer.

Back to Top | Article Outline

METHODS

Experimental conditions were: arm use with FR pedaling (AF), no arm use with FR pedaling (NF), arm use with BK pedaling (AB), and no arm use with BK pedaling (NB). Conditions were performed at 4, 8, and 12 resistances at 100 strides per minute. Variables measured were HR, percent max HR, relative VO2, percent of relative VO2 max, absolute caloric expenditure (CE), and relative CE. RPE values were assessed for the arms (A), chest (C), legs (L) and overall body (O). 12 subjects completed all conditions in random order for five minutes. The HR and relative VO2 were collected during the last minute of each trial. RPE values were recorded during the 3rd minute of each trial. An ANOVA was conducted to determine differences.

Back to Top | Article Outline

RESULTS

Results indicated that increased resistance produced greater physiological and RPE values. However, the results also revealed that the use of moving handlebars produced similar physiological and perceptual responses when compared to stationary handlebars during forward or backward pedalling. In addition, changing pedalling direction did not significantly alter the physiological and perceptual responses.

Table

Table

Back to Top | Article Outline

CONCLUSION

The elliptical trainer allowed for a variety of workout combinations, however, these various combinations did not modify the physiological or perceptual responses in any meaningful way.

©2003The American College of Sports Medicine