Journal Logo

Annual Meeting Abstracts

EFFECT OF LIVING IN HYPOXIA AND TRAINING IN NORMOXIA ON SEA LEVEL VO2max AND RED CELL MASS

Rusko, H. K. FACSM; Tikkanen, H.; Paavolainen, L.; Hämäläinen, I.; Kalliokoski, K.; Puranen, A.

Author Information
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: May 1999 - Volume 31 - Issue 5 - p S86
  • Free

Abstract 277

Living at moderate altitude and training at low altitude has been shown to increase sea level maximum oxygen uptake (VO2max) and red cell mass (RCM). In the present study the effect of living in a simulated normobaric hypoxia and training at sea level was studied in 12 experimental (HILO) and 10 control (LOLO) cross country skiers and triathletes (17 men and 5 women, age 24±4 yrs, height 176±7 cm, body mass 70±9 kg). HILO athletes lived 12-16 h daily for 25 days in normobaric hypoxia (O2 15.3% ∼2500 m) and trained in normoxia at sea level. LOLO athletes lived and trained at sea level. VO2max was measured before (PRE), immediately after (POST1) and one week after (POST7) and RCM before and after the experimental period, and erythropoietin (EPO) before, on days 2, 11, 18 and 25 during, and 4-7 days after the experimental period. ANOVA indicated significant group by time interaction in each variable. (Table)

Table
Table

On days 2 and 25 EPO was 60% and 14% higher than PRE, respectively, but EPO values were not related to the increase in RCM. We conclude that 25-day acclimatization to living high and training low using simulated atmosphere at sea level increased red cell mass by 5%. Sea level VO2max showed a delayed increase of 3%.

Section Description

American College of Sports Medicine; 46th Annual Meeting; Washington State; Convention & Trade Center; June 2-5, 1999

The abstracts contained herein were prepared by the authors and then printed by photo-offset without correction. The accuracy, form of citation, designation, nomenclature, and the like, all remain the responsibility of the author. Readers should note that the appearance of an abstract does not imply future publication of a regular scientific manuscript.

A-49 SLIDE TRAINING I

© 1999 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.