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A Collection of Physical Activity Questionnaires for Health-Related Research

Bouchard Three-Day Physical Activity Record

Medicine& Science in Sports & Exercise: June 1997 - Volume 29 - Issue 6 - p 19-24
  • Free
  • Activity component(s) assessed: Leisure and occupational
  • Time frame of recall: Three d (2 weekdays and 1 weekend day)
  • Original mode of administration: Self-administered with instruction provided by interviewer
  • Primary source of information: Dr. Claude Bouchard; Laval University; Physical Activity Sci. Lab.; P.E.P.S.; Ste-Foy, PQ G1K7P4; Canada
  • Primary reference: Bouchard, C., A. Tremblay, C. LeBlanc, G. Lortie, R. Savard, and G. Theriault. A method to assess energy expenditure in children and adults. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 37:461-467, 1983.

RELIABILITY AND VALIDITY STUDIES

Tables 4,5

BOUCHARD THREE DAY PHYSICAL ACTIVITY RECORD

Table

Activity Codes for the Bouchard Three Day Physical Activity Record

Table

Reprinted by permission of the publisher from Bouchard, C., A. Tremblay, C. LeBlanc, G. Lortie, R. Sauard, and G. Therialt. A method to assess energy expenditure in children and adults. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 37:461-467, 1983. Copyright 1983 by the American Society of Clinical Nutrition.

INSTRUCTIONS

The Three-Day Physical Activity Record is used to self-record daily physical activities over 3 days (2 weekdays and 1 weekend day). The day preceding laboratory testing should not be used as one of the 3 days of which the record is maintained. The record is divided into nine categories of physical activity. The participant fills in the boxes corresponding to physical activities performed during the specific time periods.

The record should be explained in the following manner:

  1. Summarize the aim of the physical activity record.
  2. Mention that the record:
    1. will be maintained during 3 days (2 weekdays and 1 weekend day), chosen at the convenience of the participant.
    2. will be completed on the same days as the food record (if applicable).
    3. will not be completed on the day preceding any laboratory testing.
  3. Ask the subject to fill in his/her surname, first name, and the date in the appropriate space.
  4. Indicate how to complete the record.
    1. Read the first sentence of the explanatory text on the left of the record form.
    2. Explain the system of codes for each category of activities and read the examples for each group given on the last two pages.
    3. Move on to the example below.
    4. Mention that each box should be filled.
    5. Suggest the possibility of drawing a straight line in the boxes wherever the same activity is repeated (see example).
    6. Mention that there should be only one number/box (that the subject should write in the activity which was carried out the most during the given period).
    7. Mention that the subject should balance taking part in certain activities(for example: for 1 h of hockey, the subject should fill in 3 × 15 min“seated” and 1 × 15 min of “intense physical activities”).
    8. Mention that the subject should not change his/her habits.

When the record has been collected it is recommended that the interviewer do the following:

  1. Verify that each box is filled.
  2. Ask whether certain activities were difficult to encode.
  3. Verify that the dates of the 3 days are filled in.

CALCULATIONS

The 3-day record (2 weekdays and 1 weekend day) is divided into 15-min intervals. Activities are quantified on a 1-to-9 scale of energy cost, as published by Passmore and Durnin (4), Durnin and Passmore(3), and Consolazio et al. (2). Median energy cost in kilocalories per kilogram per 15-min intervals is used to compute daily energy expenditure (1).

EXAMPLE FOR ENTERING DATA ABOUT DAILY PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES

Table

ENTERING DATA - THE BOUCHARD THREE DAY PHYSICAL ACTIVITY RECORD

Name: Jane Doe

Table

Reprinted by permission of the publisher from Bouchard, C., A. Tremblay, C. LeBlanc, G. Lortie, R. Sauard, and G. Therialt. A method to assess energy expenditure in children and adults. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 37:461-467, 1983. Copyright 1983 by the American Society of Clinical Nutrition.

EXAMPLE

Table

OTHER STUDIES USING THE QUESTIONNAIRE

In addition to the references cited above, at least one additional study has used the Bouchard Three-Day Activity Record (5).

T1-6
T2-6
T3-6
T4-6
T5-6
T6-6
T7-6
T8-6

REFERENCES

1. Bouchard, C., A. Tremblay, C. LeBlanc, G. Lortie, R. Sauard, and G. Therialt. A method to assess energy expenditure in children and adults. Am. J. Clin. Nutr. 37:461-467, 1983.
2. Consolazio, C. F., R. E. Johnson, and L. J. Pecora.Physiological Measurements of Metabolic Functions in Man. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1963.
3. Durnin, J. V. G. A. and R. Passmore. Energy, Work, and Leisure. London: Heinemann Educational Books, 1967.
4. Passmore, R. and J. V. G. A. Durnin. Human energy expenditure. Physiol. Rev. 35:801-840, 1955.
5. Perusse, L., A. Tremblay, C. LeBlanc, and C. Bouchard. Genetic and environmental influences on level of habitual physical activity and exercise participation. Am. J. Epidemiol. 129:1012-1022, 1989.

Section Description

SECTION I. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRES USED IN THE GENERAL POPULATION

© Williams & Wilkins 1997. All Rights Reserved.