Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness and Topical Analgesic Alter Corticospinal Excitability of the Biceps Brachii

STEFANELLI, LUCAS1; LOCKYER, EVAN J.1,2; COLLINS, BRANDON W.1; SNOW, NICHOLAS J.2; CROCKER, JULIE1; KENT, CHRISTOPHER1; POWER, KEVIN E.1,2; BUTTON, DUANE C.1,2

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: November 2019 - Volume 51 - Issue 11 - p 2344–2356
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000002055
APPLIED SCIENCES
Buy

Introduction The interactive effect of delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) and a topical analgesic on corticospinal excitability was investigated.

Methods Thirty-two participants completed Experiments A (no DOMS) and B (DOMS). For each experiment, participants were randomly assigned to two groups: 1) topical analgesic gel (topical analgesic, n = 8), or 2) placebo gel (placebo, n = 8) group. Before the application of gel (pregel), as well as 5, 15, 30, and 45 min postgel, motor-evoked potential (MEP) area, latency, and silent period, as well as cervicomedullary MEP and maximal compound motor unit action potential areas and latencies were measured. In addition, pressure–pain threshold (PPT) was measured pre-DOMS and at the same timepoints in experiment B.

Results In experiment A, neither group showed a significant change for any outcome measure. In experiment B, both groups exhibited a significant decrease in PPT from pre-DOMS to pregel. After the application of topical analgesic, but not placebo, there was a significant increase in PPT at 45 min postgel, respectively, compared with pregel and a main effect of time for the silent period to increase compared with pregel. Participants with DOMS had reduced MEP and cervicomedullary MEP areas and increased corticospinal silent periods compared with those who did not have DOMS.

Conclusions These findings suggest that DOMS reduced corticospinal excitability and after the administration of menthol-based topical analgesic, there was a reduction in pain, which was accompanied by increased corticospinal inhibition.

1School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, CANADA

2Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John’s, NL, CANADA

Address for correspondence: Duane C. Button, Ph.D., School of Human Kinetics and Recreation, Memorial University of Newfoundland, 230 Elizabeth Ave, St. John’s, Newfoundland, Canada A1C 5S7; E-mail: dbutton@mun.ca.

Submitted for publication January 2019.

Accepted for publication May 2019.

Online date: May 31, 2019

© 2019 American College of Sports Medicine