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Let the Pleasure Guide Your Resistance Training Intensity

ELSANGEDY, HASSAN MOHAMED1; MACHADO, DANIEL GOMES DA SILVA1,2; KRINSKI, KLEVERTON3; DUARTE DO NASCIMENTO, PAULO HENRIQUE1; DE AMORIM OLIVEIRA, GLEDSON TAVARES1; SANTOS, TONY MEIRELES4; HARGREAVES, ELAINE A.5; PARFITT, GAYNOR6

Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise: July 2018 - Volume 50 - Issue 7 - p 1472–1479
doi: 10.1249/MSS.0000000000001573
Applied Sciences

Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and reliability of the Feeling Scale (FS) to self-regulate resistance training (RT) intensity.

Methods Sixteen sedentary men (39.7 ± 7.5 yr) performed 3 familiarization sessions, 2 one-repetition maximum (1RM) testing, and 16 RT sessions (four sessions for each FS descriptor; randomized). The FS descriptors were “very good” (FS + 5), “good” (FS + 3), “fairly good” (FS + 1), and “fairly bad” (FS − 1). Resistance exercises were leg press, chest press, knee extension, and seated biceps curl. Participants were instructed to select a load associated with the verbal/numerical descriptor of the FS to perform three sets of 10 repetitions.

Results Participants lifted a significantly greater %1RM as the FS level decreased from FS + 5 to FS − 1 (P < 0.001). The mean %1RM values for the FS descriptors of +5, +3, +1, and −1, respectively, were as follows: leg press, 42.5% ± 9.5%, 58.2% ± 7.4%, 69.9% ± 7.0%, and 80.7% ± 5.4%; knee extensor, 37.4% ± 9.6%, 54.5% ± 9.3%, 65.3% ± 8.7%, and 78.2% ± 5.9%; chest press, 42.4% ± 11.3%, 54.9% ± 11.4%, 66.4% ± 12.6%, and 78.2% ± 13.5%; and biceps curl, 39.0% ± 8.1%, 54.0% ± 9.7%, 68.4% ± 5.9%, and 83.2% ± 3.0%. The interclass correlation coefficient over the four experimental sessions ranged from 0.73 to 0.99 for %1RM and from 0.77 to 0.99 for weight lifted, with a coefficient of variation of approximately 7%, 4%, 2%, and 2% for FS descriptors of +5, +3, +1, and −1, respectively.

Conclusion This study is the first to demonstrate that the FS can be used to self-regulate exercise intensity in RT. The lower the FS descriptor, the higher the weight lifted. In addition, the load self-selected for each FS descriptor was reliable across the four sessions.

1Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Natal, RN, BRAZIL;

2Center of Physical Education and Sports, Londrina State University, Londrina, PR, BRAZIL;

3Center for Health Sciences, Universidade Estadual do Norte do Paraná, Jacarezinho, Paraná, BRAZIL;

4Department of Physical Education, Pernambuco Federal University, Recife, BRAZIL;

5School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Otago, Dunedin, NEW ZEALAND; and

6School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, AUSTRALIA

Address for correspondence: Hassan Mohamed Elsangedy, Ph.D., Department of Physical Education, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Av. Senador Salgado Filho, 1610, Lagoa Nova, 59.056-000, Natal, Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil; E-mail: hassan.elsangedy@gmail.com.

Submitted for publication September 2017.

Accepted for publication February 2018.

© 2018 American College of Sports Medicine