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RAYEN PETEE B.; DBINKWATER, BARBARA. L.; HORVATH, STEVEN M.
Medicine and Science in Sports: Winter 1972
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ABSTRACTTwo groups of female track athletes, designated sprinters (N=8) and runners (N=13) by reason of their running events, ages 13 to 18 years, were the subjects of these experiments. Two tests of maximum aerobic capacity were used — a modified Balke treadmill test and a sustained maximum capacity test. Cardiac output was determined during the fifth minute of the sustained maximum capacity test at a near maximal oxygen uptake. Cardiorespiratory parameters were determined during rest, warm-up and maximum exercise. There were no significant differences between the two groups at rest or during the warm-up for all parameters; however, the runners had a greater cardiac output (P < 0.01) due to a greater stroke volume during near maximal exercise. As the oxygen uptake at the time of cardiac output determinations between the two groups was similar, the runners had a lower arterio-venous oxygen extraction (P < 0.05) during near maximal work. Comparisons between previously reported data indicated that the cardiovascular ability of these young athletes was similar to young normal adult women (mean age 21 years) and that the runners, whose training regimen emphasizes cardiovascular endurance, maintained the same relationship between oxygen uptake and cardiac output throughout all levels of oxygen uptake.

Two groups of female track athletes, designated sprinters (N=8) and runners (N=13) by reason of their running events, ages 13 to 18 years, were the subjects of these experiments. Two tests of maximum aerobic capacity were used — a modified Balke treadmill test and a sustained maximum capacity test. Cardiac output was determined during the fifth minute of the sustained maximum capacity test at a near maximal oxygen uptake. Cardiorespiratory parameters were determined during rest, warm-up and maximum exercise. There were no significant differences between the two groups at rest or during the warm-up for all parameters; however, the runners had a greater cardiac output (P < 0.01) due to a greater stroke volume during near maximal exercise. As the oxygen uptake at the time of cardiac output determinations between the two groups was similar, the runners had a lower arterio-venous oxygen extraction (P < 0.05) during near maximal work. Comparisons between previously reported data indicated that the cardiovascular ability of these young athletes was similar to young normal adult women (mean age 21 years) and that the runners, whose training regimen emphasizes cardiovascular endurance, maintained the same relationship between oxygen uptake and cardiac output throughout all levels of oxygen uptake.

©1972The American College of Sports Medicine