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Departments: From the Editor

Ten Insightful Reasons to Read This Issue

Roy, Brad A. Ph.D., FACSM

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ACSM's Health & Fitness Journal: March/April 2020 - Volume 24 - Issue 2 - p 1
doi: 10.1249/FIT.0000000000000557
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  • 1. Exercise is perhaps the best medicine for Parkinson’s disease. Consistent with other medical conditions, regular movement provides significant benefits for people challenged with Parkinson’s disease. You’ll garner some valuable insights into working with this special population by reading “Exercising for People with Parkinson’s Disease and Their Support Group,” this issue’s Health & Fitness From A to Z column written by Daniel M. Corcos, Ph.D. and Elizabeth M. Skender, ACSM-CEP.
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  • 2. Now is the time to take action! Despite the strong evidence regarding the importance of physical activity on people’s health, the connection between health care and fitness professionals has been ultra-slow to materialize. Cherie D. Pettitt, Ed.D., FACSM and Elizabeth A. Joy, M.D., M.P.H., FACSM, further discuss this challenge and offer a few practical steps fitness professionals should consider in their feature article: “Connecting Health Care and Health and Fitness: Part II — Solutions and Call to Action.”
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  • 3. Inclusivity, more than a policy! Physical activity and exercise training are critical health components for people with disabilities. Yet many fitness facilities are not fully engaged in inclusive practices. Learn more about how your facility can provide exceptional experiences for people with disabilities by reading “Steps for Community Fitness Organizations Seeking to Engage in Inclusive Practices,” a wonderfully written feature article by Jodi Stinson, M.S.; Kathleen McCarty, M.A., CPT; and Megan MacDonald, Ph.D.
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  • 4. Isometric exercise? For those fitness professionals working with time-constrained clients, isometric exercise may be another tool in the toolbox for encouraging physical activity. Albert Thomas Anastasio, M.D., provides a few tips for using isometric exercise with your clients in his feature article, “Discrete Isometric Exercise for the Individual with Time and Facility Constraints.”
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  • 5. The dead lift: are you correctly instructing your clients? A frequently used training exercise, the dead lift is often performed with incorrect technique, putting clients at risk of injury. Peter Ronai, M.S., FACSM, breaks down the proper technique for this excellent exercise and shares some key teaching points in this issue’s Do It Right column.
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  • 6. Your client’s New Year plans run amok? Find out why our great intentions are often not accomplished in this issue’s Enhancing Your Behavioral Toolkit column, “Not Today, Lack of Self-Control, Not Today.” Elegantly penned by Liz Hathaway, Ph.D., MPH, and Mckenzie Gregg, MPH(c), I am sure you will find a bit of yourself in this column (I sure did!).
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  • 7. Which ACSM certification is right for you? In this issue’s ACSM Certification column, Paul M. Gallo, Ph.D., FACSM, reviews the scope and role of the primary ACSM professional certifications. If you or someone you know is considering an ACSM certification, be sure to read “A Health Fitness Professional, Group Exercise Instructor, and a Clinical Exercise Physiologist Walk into a Fitness Facility.”
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  • 8. Passionate about promoting physical activity in your community? Then this article is for you! Kristi M. King, Ph.D., CHES, and Kimberly Hartson, R.N., Ph.D., discuss the steps for using a program planning model to successfully promote physical activity interventions. Learn more about this great tool by reading this issue’s Clinical Applications column, “Using a Health Promotion Program Planning Model to Promote Physical Activity and Exercise.”
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  • 9. Supporting our vets through the power of movement! Dixie Stanforth, Ph.D., FACSM and Jennifer Van Overdam, M.Ed., share the powerful effect that physical activity has on our nation’s veterans in this issue’s Celebrate Success! column, “Still on a Mission: The Stories of Make a Vet Sweat and Heroes' Movement.” These two tremendous programs are worth celebrating!
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  • 10. Are you or your clients SAD? Pick up a few important facts to share with clients regarding seasonal affective disorder (SAD) by reading this issue’s Take Ten column, brilliantly written by James A. Peterson, Ph.D., FACSM.
© 2020 American College of Sports Medicine.