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DEPARTMENTS: ACSM Newsbriefs

ACSM Newsbriefs

ACSM’s Health & Fitness Journal: July/August 2012 - Volume 16 - Issue 4 - p 2
doi: 10.1249/FIT.0b013e31825a6a7e
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In Brief

OUCH! CAN EXERCISE HELP REDUCE PAIN SENSITIVITY?

With pain affecting up to 50% of adults at any given time, it has become an increasingly important public health concern. A study published in the July 2012 issue of Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise®, the official journal of the American College of Sports Medicine, examined whether meeting current physical activity recommendations was associated with reduced pain sensitivity in healthy women.

Self-reported and accelerometer measures of physical activity and sedentary behavior were collected and compared with pain intensity and unpleasantness ratings to noxious thermal stimuli in a sample of 21 healthy women. Participants were classified into two groups based on accelerometer data: meets physical activity recommendations (150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or 75 minutes per week of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity) and insufficiently active. Participants meeting physical activity recommendations had significantly lower unpleasantness ratings than their insufficiently active peers. Analyses demonstrated a significant relationship between minutes spent in vigorous physical activity and both pain intensity and pain unpleasantness ratings. Relationships were not significant for moderate activity or sedentary behavior.

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Based on preliminary evidence, participation in vigorous activity appears to be associated with decreased pain sensitivity. Furthermore, the results have a number of potential applications, including aiding our understanding of why exercise functions as a treatment for those with chronic pain conditions, and providing a rationale for including physical activity assessment in pain research.

INTERNATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR WORKSITE HEALTH PROMOTION OFFERS CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

The International Association for Worksite Health Promotion (IAWHP), in partnership with Human Kinetics, recently launched a 5-hour, self-paced, online certificate course. The IAWHP Online Certificate Course provides a road map for designing successful evidence-based health promotion programs in the workplace. The online course contains principles of best practice for scalable and sustainable worksite programs. This informative course is complemented by the text ACSM’s Worksite Health Handbook, second edition, which serves as a valuable reference.

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At the end of the course, participants will take an examination that tests knowledge and comprehension of the material. Successful completion of the examination earns a certificate from IAWHP. The cost is $199 for the course and ACSM’s Worksite Health Handbook, second edition, or $149 for the course only. To learn more or to begin taking the course, please visit http://www.humankinetics.com/iawhp.

ACSM SELF-TESTS NOW ONLINE!

Are you looking for the continuing education credit (CEC) self-test in this issue? We have officially transitioned all of our self-tests online! Earning CECs has never been faster or easier. Now you can take the online test and print your CEC certificate immediately after earning a passing grade. Check out the new ACSM online learning platform here: www.onlinelearning-acsm.org. Turn to page 40 in this issue for test instructions.

MARK YOUR CALENDAR NOW FOR ACSM’S 2013 HEALTH & FITNESS SUMMIT & EXPOSITION

Before you know it, it will be time for another Health & Fitness Summit & Exposition sponsored by the American College of Sports Medicine. Mark your calendars now for March 12–15, 2013. The 2013 Summit will be held in Las Vegas, NV. Stay tuned to www.acsm.org/summit for more details.

© 2012 American College of Sports Medicine.