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INTERVAL TRAINING FOR CARDIOMETABOLIC AND BRAIN HEALTH

Gibala, Martin J., Ph.D.; Heisz, Jennifer J., Ph.D.; Nelson, Aimee J., Ph.D.

doi: 10.1249/FIT.0000000000000428
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Apply It! 1. Engaging in interval exercise can boost fitness and improve your mood in a time-efficient manner.

2. Short exercise breaks like climbing the stairs can refocus attention and help maintain productivity in the workplace.

3. Combining interval exercises with motor skill training in a clinical setting can augment the recovery of function.

Martin J. Gibala, Ph.D., is a professor and chair of the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University. He studies the beneficial effects of exercise at the molecular to whole-body level in both healthy individuals and people with chronic diseases. He has coauthored a bestselling book that translates the research on interval training for health and fitness, The One-Minute Workout: Science Shows a Way to Get Fit That’s Smarter, Faster, Shorter.

Jennifer J. Heisz, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University. Her research examines the effects of physical activity on brain function to promote mental health and cognition in young adults, older adults, and individuals with Alzheimer’s disease. Recent honors include an Early Researcher Award from the Government of Ontario and the Petro-Canada Young Innovator Award.

Aimee J. Nelson, Ph.D., is an associate professor in the Department of Kinesiology at McMaster University and holds a Canada Research Chair (Tier 2) in Sensorimotor Neuroscience. Her research is focused on promoting neural plasticity in the brain and spinal cord to improve movement of the upper limb, and she uses exercise as a method to promote neural plasticity. She has authored numerous research articles focused on promoting neural plasticity in humans.

Disclosure: The authors declare no conflict of interest and do not have any financial disclosures.

© 2018 American College of Sports Medicine.