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The Microvasculature and Skeletal Muscle Health in Aging

Landers-Ramos, Rian, Q.2,3; Prior, Steven, J.1,2,3

doi: 10.1249/JES.0000000000000151
Brief Review: PDF Only

Aging and aging-related declines in physical activity are associated with physical and metabolic impairments. Skeletal muscle capillarization is reduced in sedentary older adults, may contribute to impairments in skeletal muscle, and is modifiable by exercise training. This article examines the hypothesis that preservation of skeletal muscle capillarization is essential to maintain metabolism, fitness and function with aging.

1Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland School of Public Health, College Park, MD

2Baltimore Veterans Affairs Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Baltimore, MD

3Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD

Correspondence to: Steven J. Prior, Ph.D., Department of Kinesiology, University of Maryland School of Public Health, 4200 Valley Drive, Room 2134D, College Park, MD 20742. Email: sprior@umd.edu; Phone: 301-405-2483

Funding: Dr. Landers-Ramos was supported by NIH T32-HL007698 and the Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center (GRECC). Dr. Prior was supported by a Paul B. Beeson Career Development Award in Aging (K23- AG040775 and the American Federation for Aging Research), Baltimore Veterans Affairs Medical Center GRECC, and the University of Maryland Claude D. Pepper Older Americans Independence Center (P30-AG028747).

Conflicts of Interest: The authors have no conflict of interest to disclose.

© 2018 American College of Sports Medicine