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ACSM Clinician Profile

Current Sports Medicine Reports: January 2015 - Volume 14 - Issue 1 - p 1
doi: 10.1249/JSR.0000000000000105
ACSM Clinician Profile
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The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) is proud to feature Chad A. Asplund, MD, MPH, FACSM, in this issue’s Clinician Profile. Dr. Asplund is an associate professor of Family Medicine. He received his Doctor of Medicine degree from the University of Pittsburgh and then completed a family medicine residency at DeWitt Army Community Hospital in Fort Belvoir, VA. He practiced full-service family medicine in the Army for 4 years at Fort Gordon, including a combat tour to Afghanistan. Following his obligation in the Army, he completed a Sports Medicine fellowship at the Ohio State University and served as a team physician for 2 years. Dr. Asplund joined Student Health in August 2013 as medical director. He recently completed his Master of Public Health degree from the University of Florida. Dr. Asplund has a special interest in sports medicine, endurance sports or physical activity, and public health. He joined the Editorial Board of Current Sports Medicine Reports in January 2014, has served as a reviewer for a number of years, and most recently was named the incoming section editor for the Extremity and Joint Conditions section of the journal.

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You Have Been an ACSM Member Since 2003. How Has ACSM Grown and Changed Since You Became a Member?

ACSM’s Annual Meetings keep getting better. The Exercise is Medicine® initiative and the additional content for the meeting as well as the state efforts on EIM really have elevated ACSM’s visibility.

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What Was It Like To Be a Clinician a Decade Ago Compared with Today?

The science and knowledge of common sports injuries such as tendinopathy and the role of inflammation are understood better today compared with 10 years ago. ACSM has had many presentations on the role of new agents for treatment of tendinopathy (platelet rich plasma, prolotherapy, etc.). In addition, the advent of ultrasound to assist in the diagnosis and guidance of treatment for many chronic and acute problems is different.

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How Has Membership in ACSM Influenced Your Career?

ACSM has proven to be a valuable network of professionals from both the clinical and scientific side and has allowed me to collaborate with sports scientists in many ways.

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How Do You Use the ACSM Network in Your Daily Work?

Day to day, I reach out to my ACSM network to assist in the care of endurance athletes or to find “experts” in the field to help me answer clinical questions.

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What Is Your Best Advice to Other Sports Medicine Clinicians?

Get involved! ACSM, although a large organization, clearly has room for clinicians. It is really neat to see the science being presented and then watch as it becomes clinical practice a few years later.

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Where Do You See ACSM Heading in the Future?

I see ACSM continuing to lobby for exercise and the prevention of chronic diseases and continuing to drive sports medicine research.

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Would You Like To Share Anything Else with the Readers of Current Sports Medicine Reports?

I really appreciate the content in Current Sports Medicine Reports to assist me with my day-to-day care of active people. The journal is only as good as those who contribute, so take a chance and turn from a reader to a contributor.

Copyright © 2015 by the American College of Sports Medicine.