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Clinician Profile

ACSM CLINICIAN PROFILE

Current Sports Medicine Reports: September 2009 - Volume 8 - Issue 5 - p 215
doi: 10.1249/JSR.0b013e3181b7d201
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This month's American College of Sports Medicine's (ACSM) Clinician Profile features James L. Moeller, M.D., FACSM, who is a board-certified sports medicine specialist. He currently serves as the head team physician for Troy High School and as a team physician for Oakland University Golden Grizzlies, USA Speed Skating, Bloomfield Hills Lahser High School, Bloomfield Hills Andover, and Troy Athens High School. Dr. Moeller has served as the U.S. team physician for the Summer World University Games in 2005 and was the chief medical officer for the U.S. Winter World University Games in 2007. He also was a U.S. Olympic team physician at the 2006 Olympic Winter Games in Torino, Italy.

YOU HAVE BEEN AN ACSM MEMBER SINCE 1995. HOW HAS ACSM GROWN AND CHANGED SINCE YOU BECAME A MEMBER?

The obvious growth in numbers and diversity is a testament to the quality of the College. As a clinician, I have seen ACSM really listen to our needs and make changes to assist the clinician in professional development. Adding Current Sports Medicine Reports to the family of journals, publishing ACSM's Primary Care Sports Medicine textbook, and expanding the number of clinically based opportunities at the Annual Meeting are several examples. An organization is only as strong as its members, and ACSM has worked hard to become an organization that is dedicated to the improvement of the clinical aspects of sports medicine.

WHAT WAS IT LIKE TO BE A CLINICIAN IN THE 1990s COMPARED WITH TODAY?

It definitely is more difficult to be a clinician today. More is expected of us, and rightfully so. It isn't enough just to know the medicine anymore. We have to be current in all areas that affect the athlete, including injury prevention, performance enhancement, rehabilitation, nutrition, and psychological issues. Staying current in all of these areas is a monumental task, but being a part of ACSM allows the clinician to make contacts and stay up-to-date in all of these areas.

HOW HAS MEMBERSHIP IN ACSM INFLUENCED YOUR CAREER?

Being a member of ACSM has influenced me in so many ways. It has provided me an educational forum to improve my knowledge base and skill set, and it has provided me an opportunity to serve in leadership roles through the Medical Education Committee, Strategic Planning Committee, election to the Board of Trustees, and now as a member of the ACSM/USADA Task Force. ACSM also has recognized me as a Fellow of the College, a distinction that I am very proud and appreciative of, which serves as a sign of my commitment to not only the College, but to the field of sports medicine. Through the College, I have formed many friendships with not only clinicians in a variety of specialties, but with research scientists, nutritionists, and physical therapists, all of whom have helped me develop professionally.

HOW DO YOU USE THE ACSM NETWORK IN YOUR DAILY WORK?

I regularly refer to ACSM journals and other publications, and I keep in contact with my colleagues in a variety of fields to help me take better care of my patients and teams.

WHAT IS YOUR BEST ADVICE TO OTHER SPORTS MEDICINE CLINICIANS?

Keep learning. It is very easy to become comfortable with your current knowledge base and "get in a groove" of evaluating and treating patients based on what you learned in your residency and fellowship training. That may work well in many cases, but staying current and up-to-date will allow you to provide the best care. My other piece of advice is to find ways to really enjoy what you do. If you truly love your job, it's never, really "work."

WHERE DO YOU SEE ACSM HEADING IN THE FUTURE?

I see ACSM spearheading the effort to make exercise an essential component of daily life, utilizing its positive effects to assist in primary and secondary prevention of chronic disease and in managing a myriad of problems, including heart disease, diabetes, and depression. It's not just about elite athletes; it's about everyone, and ACSM has always known that. I also see ACSM supporting outcomes-based research to continue advancing the clinical component of sports medicine.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO SHARE ANYTHING ELSE WITH THE READERS OF CURRENT SPORTS MEDICINE REPORTS?

Just that I remain a proud member of ACSM, and I look forward to working with everyone as we take the field of sports medicine to the next level.

© 2009 American College of Sports Medicine