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A Fond Farewell

doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000002968
From the Editor
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After 7 years of innovation, leadership, and care, David P. Sklar’s time as editor-in-chief of Academic Medicine has come to an end. Dr. Sklar has guided the journal through tremendous change while upholding the highest editorial standards.

Dr. Sklar embraced emerging technologies and shepherded Academic Medicine into the age of social media. Under his leadership, the journal began publishing our popular Innovation Reports; produced an ebook consisting entirely of AM Last Pages1; and developed a successful Twitter feed (@AcadMedJournal), blog (http://academicmedicineblog.org), and podcast.

As the journal’s social media offerings have grown, so have submissions to the journal (increasing by over 50%). Through this tremendous growth, the quality of articles published in Academic Medicine has remained sterling. The journal has remained essential reading for those in the academic medicine world due in no small part to Dr. Sklar’s commitment to quality and his uncanny understanding of what is—and what will become—important. Under Dr. Sklar’s guidance, Academic Medicine’s impact factor has grown, and the journal has consistently placed as #2 or #1 among journals in its category (Education, Scientific Disciplines) in Clarivate Analytics’ annual ranking.

Dr. Sklar has amplified new and diverse voices. He has invited medical students, residents, and fellows to submit letters to the editor2–4; added trainee representation to the editorial board; and published articles on international medical education partnerships.

These successes are complemented by Dr. Sklar’s thoughtfulness and deep concern for what matters. His dedication to learners, patients, authors, reviewers, and staff is evident in the editorials he has written, the topics he has pursued through his New Conversations series,5–8 and his daily interactions with those he encounters.

We have valued his insights, his respect for our views when making editorial decisions, his willingness to try new projects, and his friendship.

The Staff of Academic Medicine

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References

1. Artino AR Jr. Conducting research in health professions education: From idea to publication. AM Last Pages: 2010–2016. November 2016. https://journals.lww.com/academicmedicine/Documents/Conducting_Research_eBook.pdf. Accessed August 7, 2019.
2. Call for letters to the editor. AM Rounds. http://academicmedicineblog.org/call-for-letters-to-the-editor. Published August 18, 2016. Accessed August 7, 2019.
3. Call for letters to the editor from student and resident authors. AM Rounds. http://academicmedicineblog.org/call-for-letters-to-the-editor-from-student-and-resident-authors. Published August 7, 2017. Accessed August 7, 2019.
4. Call for letters to the editor from student and resident authors. AM Rounds. http://academicmedicineblog.org/call-for-letters-to-the-editor-from-student-and-resident-authors-2. Published August 21, 2018. Accessed August 7, 2019.
5. Sklar DP. A new conversation on trust in health care and health professions education. Acad Med. 2018;93:1748–1749.
6. Sklar DP. New conversations: Justice, disparities, and meeting the needs of our most vulnerable populations. Acad Med. 2017;92:1506–1507.
7. Sklar DP. Global health education in a changing world: The next new conversations topic. Acad Med. 2016;91:603–606.
8. Sklar DP. New conversations about health reform and academic health centers: Introducing a new feature in Academic Medicine. Acad Med. 2015;90:1–2.
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