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In Reply to Korman et al

Tackett, Sean, MD, MPH; Waldman, Vincent, PhD; Marshall, Tanner, MS

doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000002601
Letters to the Editor
Free

Assistant professor of medicine and international medical education director, Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, and research director, Osmosis, Baltimore, Maryland; stacket1@jhmi.edu; https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5369-7225.

Director of video production, Osmosis, Baltimore, Maryland.

Creative director, Osmosis, Baltimore, Maryland.

Disclosures: Dr. Tackett receives salary support from Osmosis for research and scholarship. Mr. Marshall and Dr. Waldman were involved in development and administration of the Osmosis YouTube channel and are Osmosis employees.

We thank the authors for referencing our study in their letter, which describes how online medical education videos can quickly reach a cross-section of the global population that has Internet access. We wholeheartedly agree with the authors that the precious time health professions educators and students spend together should be used to deepen their shared understanding of medical knowledge, clinical reasoning, and what it means to be a professional. In most cases, this will require faculty development programs to prepare faculty for their roles in using educational technologies1 and in facilitating student learning. Such an investment would likely pay off in greater learning efficiency, improved faculty–student relationships, and more positive learning environments.

We would also like to add that advances in educational technologies can do more than improve institution-based learning. Comments on the Osmosis videos on the YouTube channel and elsewhere have shown that online videos impact health professions students, patients, and their loved ones across a variety of settings by enhancing their understanding of medical ailments and treatments. As health professions educators engage with emerging educational technologies, we should consider not only the potential of these resources to revolutionize medical education for future health care workers but also their potential to democratize high-quality health education and improve health literacy on a large scale.2

Sean Tackett, MD, MPH

Assistant professor of medicine and international medical education director, Division of General Internal Medicine, Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, and research director, Osmosis, Baltimore, Maryland; stacket1@jhmi.edu; https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5369-7225.

Vincent Waldman, PhD

Director of video production, Osmosis, Baltimore, Maryland.

Tanner Marshall, MS

Creative director, Osmosis, Baltimore, Maryland.

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References

1. Simpson D, Marcdante K, Souza KH, Anderson A, Holmboe E. Job roles of the 2025 medical educator. J Grad Med Educ. 2018;10:243–246.
2. Tackett S, Gaglani S, Heilman J, Azzam A. The reCAPTCHA of medical education [published online ahead of print April 18, 2018]. Med Teach. doi: 10.1080/0142159X.2018.1460463
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