Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

In Reply to Steinhilber et al

Packer, Clifford D. MD; Katz, Rachel B. MD

doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000001981
Letters to the Editor
Free
SDC

Professor of medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and attending physician, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio; clifford.packer@va.gov.

Clinical instructor in psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, and fellow in interventional psychiatry and mood disorders, Yale Psychiatric Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut.

Disclosures: None reported.

We thank Dr. Steinhilber and colleagues for their comments on our article and applaud their enthusiasm for case reports in medical education. The well-designed “competitive internal case report process” they have developed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB) shows the critical role of mentorship in writing and publishing case reports. In our medicine clerkship case reporting program, the scarcity of dedicated mentors may have lowered the student publication rate. At UAB, on the other hand, the authors state that “all of our residents gain faculty mentorship” (emphasis ours). We wonder how faculty are recruited and incentivized to participate in this rigorous teaching activity. Also, does the competitive nature of the program discourage the residents who are not accepted? Are they encouraged to revise and resubmit their case reports?

We also appreciate the point about teaching learners to look beyond “zebras” and focus on the educational value of the case. This gets to the historical roots of the case report. Hippocrates was not looking for novelty; he carefully described the cases that he encountered, considered what could be learned from them, and compiled his teaching points, or aphorisms. That same ancient process, when done well, can still lead to useful and often publishable case reports.

The successful case report educational program described by Dr. Steinhilber and colleagues is not an isolated phenomenon. Other similar programs are emerging,1,2 and editorial voices are beginning to call for expanded use of case reports in medical education.3,4 The next step, in our era of competencies and milestones, will be to define the specific educational objectives that can be met with case report curricula. The ability to select, prepare, and publish a case report may fulfill several of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies, including medical knowledge, patient care, practice-based learning, and communication.4 In fact, we think this activity may provide a more robust and objective assessment in some areas than the methods proposed by ACGME. We recommend that the UAB case report program and others like it should be studied and put into broader practice.

Clifford D. Packer, MD

Professor of medicine, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and attending physician, Louis Stokes Cleveland VA Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio; clifford.packer@va.gov.

Rachel B. Katz, MD

Clinical instructor in psychiatry, Yale School of Medicine, and fellow in interventional psychiatry and mood disorders, Yale Psychiatric Hospital, New Haven, Connecticut.

Back to Top | Article Outline

References

1. Stephens J, Wardrop R. Scholarship improved by case report curriculum. Clin Teach. 2016;13:411–414.
2. Besharatian B, Velez J, Rosenblum M, Stefan M, Luciano G. A case report curriculum to promote scholarship [published ahead of print November 18, 2016]. Clin Teach. doi: 10.1111/tct.12580.
3. Florek AG, Dellavalle RP. Case reports in medical education: A platform for training medical students, residents, and fellows in scientific writing and critical thinking. J Med Case Rep. 2016;10:86.
4. Sayre JW, Toklu HZ, Ye F, Mazza J, Yale S. Case reports, case series—From clinical practice to evidence-based medicine in graduate medical education. Cureus. 2017;9:e1546.
© 2017 by the Association of American Medical Colleges