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Innovation in Residency Selection

The AAMC Standardized Video Interview

Bird, Steven B., MD; Hern, H. Gene, MS, MD; Blomkalns, Andra, MD; Deiorio, Nicole M., MD; Haywood, Yolanda, MD; Hiller, Katherine M., MD, MPH; Dunleavy, Dana, PhD; Dowd, Keith, MA

doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000002705
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Purpose: Innovative tools are needed to help shift residency selection toward a more holistic process that balances academic achievement with other knowledge and skills important for success in residency. The authors evaluated the feasibility of the AAMC Standardized Video Interview (SVI) and evidence of the validity of SVI total scores.

Method: The SVI, developed by the Association of American Medical Colleges, consists of six questions designed to assess applicants’ interpersonal and communication skills and knowledge of professionalism. Study 1 was conducted in 2016 for research purposes. Study 2 was an operational pilot administration in 2017; SVI data were available for residency selection use by emergency medicine residency programs for the 2018 application cycle. Descriptive statistics, correlations, and standardized mean differences were used to examine data.

Results: Study 1 included 855 applicants; Study 2 included 3,532 applicants. SVI total scores were relatively normally distributed. There were small correlations between SVI total scores and United States Medical Licensing Examination Step exam scores, Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society membership, and Gold Humanism Honor Society membership. There were no-to-small group differences in SVI total scores by gender and race/ethnicity, and small-to-medium differences by applicant type.

Conclusions: Findings provide initial evidence of the validity of SVI total scores and suggest these scores provide different information than academic metrics. Use of the SVI, as part of a holistic screening process, may help program directors widen the pool of applicants invited to in-person interviews and may signal that programs value interpersonal and communication skills and professionalism.

S.B. Bird is program director, Department of Emergency Medicine, and vice chair for education, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts.

H.G. Hern is associate clinical professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, and vice chair of education, Highland Hospital, Oakland, California.

A. Blomkalns is chair, Department of Emergency Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.

N.M. Deiorio is associate dean for student affairs, and professor , Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia.

Y. Haywood is senior associate dean for diversity and inclusion, associate dean for student affairs, and associate professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, The George Washington University, Washington, D.C.

K.M. Hiller is professor and director, Undergraduate Education, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.

D. Dunleavy is director of admissions and selection research and development, Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, D.C.

K. Dowd was a data scientist, Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, D.C., at the time of the study.

The authors have informed the journal that they agree that both Steven B. Bird and H. Gene Hern completed the intellectual and other work typical of the work of the first author.

Acknowledgments: The authors wish to acknowledge the Emergency Medicine Standardized Video Interview (EMSVI) working group members: Ashely Alker, MD (University of California San Diego); Andra Blomkalns, MD (Stanford University School of Medicine); Steve Bird, MD (University of Massachusetts Medical School); Mary Calderone Hass, MD (University of Michigan Health System); Nicole Deiorio, MD (Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine); Ramnick Dhaliwal, MD (Hennepin County Medical Center); Fiona Gallahue, MD (The University of Washington); H. Gene Hern, MD (Highland Medical Center); Yolanda Haywood, MD (George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences); Kathy Hiller (University of Arizona College of Medicine Tucson); Zach Jarou, MD (University of Chicago); Rahul Patwari, MD (Rush University Medical Center); Christopher Woleben, MD (Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine) ; Richard Wolfe, MD (Harvard Medical School and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center)

Funding/Support: This research was funded by the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Other disclosures: D. Dunleavy is an employee and K. Dowd is a former employee of the Association of American Medical Colleges.

Ethical approval: The institutional review board of the American Institute for Research (FWA00001666) approved study 1 on June 2, 2016 and study 2 on September 30, 2017. Individuals provided explicit consent for their data to be used for research purposes when they took the SVI.

Previous presentations: A subset of these data were reported at the following meetings: 2017 Council of Residency Directors in Emergency Medicine (CORD) Academic Assembly; April 29, 2017; Fort Lauderdale, Florida; 2017 Society of Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Annual Meeting; May 18, 2017; Orlando, Florida; and Learn Serve Lead 2017: The AAMC Annual Meeting; November 5, 2017; Boston, Massachusetts.

Data: This manuscript was reviewed and approved for publication by the leadership of the Association of American Medical Colleges and of the National Board of Medical Examiners.

Correspondence should be addressed to Dana Dunleavy, Association of American Medical Colleges, 655 K Street, Washington, DC 20001; telephone: 202-862-6011; e-mail: ddunleavy@aamc.org.

© 2019 by the Association of American Medical Colleges