Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Institutional members access full text with Ovid®

Applicant Reactions to the AAMC Standardized Video Interview During the 2018 Application Cycle

Deiorio, Nicole M. MD; Jarou, Zachary J. MD; Alker, Ashely MD, MPH; Bird, Steven B. MD; Druck, Jeffrey MD; Gallahue, Fiona E. MD; Hiller, Katherine M. MD, MPH; Karl, Erin MD; Pierce, Ava E. MD; Fletcher, Laura MA; Dunleavy, Dana PhD

doi: 10.1097/ACM.0000000000002842
Research Reports
Buy
SDC

Purpose This study examined applicant reactions to the Association of American Medical Colleges Standardized Video Interview (SVI) during its first year of operational use in emergency medicine (EM) residency program selection to identify strategies to improve applicants’ SVI experience and attitudes.

Method Individuals who self-classified as EM applicants applying in the Electronic Residency Application Service 2018 cycle and who completed the SVI in summer 2017 were invited to participate in 2 surveys. Survey 1, which focused on procedural issues, was administered immediately after SVI completion. Survey 2, which focused on applicants’ SVI experience, was administered in fall 2017, after SVI scores were released.

Results The response rates for surveys 1 and 2 were 82.3% (2,906/3,532) and 58.7% (2,074/3,532), respectively. Applicant reactions varied by aspect of the SVI studied and their SVI total scores. Most applicants were satisfied with most procedural aspects of the SVI, but most applicants were not satisfied with the SVI overall or with their total SVI scores. About 20% to 30% of applicants had neutral opinions about most aspects of the SVI. Negative reactions to the SVI were stronger for applicants who scored lower on the SVI.

Conclusions Applicants had generally negative reactions to the SVI. Most were skeptical of its ability to assess the target competencies and its potential to add value to the selection process. Applicant acceptance and appreciation of the SVI will be critical to the SVI’s acceptance by the graduate medical education community.

N.M. Deiorio is associate dean for student affairs and professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, Richmond, Virginia.

Z.J. Jarou is clinical associate, Section of Emergency Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois.

A. Alker is a resident, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, San Diego, California.

S.B. Bird is program director, Department of Emergency Medicine, and vice chair for education, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts.

J. Druck is associate professor and assistant program director, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver, Colorado.

F.E. Gallahue is associate professor and director, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington.

K.M. Hiller is professor and director of undergraduate education, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine–Tucson, Tucson, Arizona.

E. Karl is a resident, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska.

A.E. Pierce is associate professor, Department of Emergency Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas.

L. Fletcher is an intern, Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

D. Dunleavy is director of admissions and selection research and development, Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

The authors have informed the journal that they agree that both Nicole M. Deiorio and Zachary J. Jarou completed the intellectual and other work typical of the first author.

Supplemental digital content for this article is available at http://links.lww.com/ACADMED/A701.

Funding/Support: This research was funded by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

Other disclosures: D. Dunleavy and L. Fletcher are employees of the AAMC.

Ethical approval: The institutional review board of the American Institutes for Research (FWA00001666) determined that the surveys were exempt on October 31, 2017. Individuals provided explicit consent for their data to be used for research purposes when they participated in the AAMC Standardized Video Interview.

Previous presentations: A subset of these data were reported at the following meetings: 2017 American Medical Association Academic Physicians Section Meeting, AMA Interim Meeting, November 2017, Honolulu, Hawaii; 2018 AAMC Continuum Connections meeting, April 2018, Orlando, Florida; 2018 Council of Residency Directors in Emergency Medicine (CORD) Academic Assembly, April 2018, San Antonio, Texas; 2018 Society of Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) meeting, May 2018, Indianapolis, Indiana.

Data: This manuscript was reviewed and approved for publication by the leadership of the Association of American Medical Colleges and of the National Board of Medical Examiners.

Correspondence should be addressed to Dana Dunleavy, Association of American Medical Colleges, 655 K St., NW, Suite 100, Washington, DC 20001; telephone: (202) 862-6011; email: ddunleavy@aamc.org.

Copyright © 2019 by the Association of American Medical Colleges