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BIRO FRANK M. M.D.; GILLMAN, MATTHEW W. M.D.; PARKER, RUTH M. M. D.; KHOURY, PHILIP R. M.S.; SIEGEL, DAVID M. M.D.
Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges: April 1990
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AbstractGraduates of all U.S. combined internal medicine-pediatrics residency programs were surveyed in 1987 regarding a variety of demographic information about their residencies and current practices, the residency curricula they had followed for both specialties, and recommendations for modifications in training. The 71 responding graduates (from a total of 112) reported patient care as their major involvement (mean of 42.9 hours per week), with a majority (83%) seeing patients in both pediatric and adult age groups. Most were involved in primary care only (64%). The graduates reported that during both pediatrics and internal medicine training, they had had too many inpatient and intensive care rotations and too few elective and ambulatory rotations. The most important subspecialty rotations in internal medicine were considered to be cardiology, dermatology, and pulmonary medicine; and in pediatrics, infectious disease, cardiology, and adolescent medicine. The graduates recommended more outpatient subspecialty rotations, ambulatory rotations in medicine and pediatrics, and a combined medicine-pediatrics continuity clinic. Acad. Med.

Portions of these data were presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Pediatric Research, Washington, D.C., on May 5, 1988, and at the annual meeting of the Society of General Internal Medicine, Washington, D.C., on April 29, 1988.

Dr. Biro is assistant professor, and Mr. Khoury is a biostatistician, Department of Pediatrics, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, Ohio; Dr. Gillman is staff physician, South Boston Community Health Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Dr. Parker is assistant professor of medicine, Department of Internal Medicine, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, Georgia, and was a fellow in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars Program at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine in Philadelphia at the time of this study; and Dr. Siegel is assistant professor, Department of Pediatrics, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York.

Correspondence and requests for reprints should be addressed to Dr. Biro, Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital Medical Center, Elland and Bethesda Avenues, Cincinnati, OH 45229.

© 1990 by the Association of American Medical Colleges