Secondary Logo

Journal Logo

Payne J L; Nowacki, C M; Girotti, J A; Townsel, J; Plagge, J C; Beckham, T W
Journal of Medical Education: May 1986
Journal Article: PDF Only
Free

The University of Illinois College of Medicine has operated a program since 1969 to recruit minority students into the college and to increase the graduation rates of these students once they enroll. Known as the Medical Opportunities Program (MOP) until 1978, the program was expanded in 1978 and renamed the Urban Health Program (UHP). The authors of the present paper discuss the results of these programs, particularly the effect of granting minority students delays in completing graduation requirements. The MOP (1969 through 1978) increased graduation rates for minority students from 55 percent for those who graduated on time to 81 percent for both on-time and delayed graduates. Under the first seven years of the UHP (1979 through 1985), more minority students have been offered places, and more have enrolled than in the 10 years of the MOP. The retention rate under the UHP, if it holds, will be higher than that under the MOP. For the combined MOP-UHP period, the retention rate for minority students was 88 percent; 69.8 percent of the graduates were on time, and 30.2 were delayed.

Created Date: 12 June 1986; Completed Date: 12 June 1986; Revised Date: 18 December 2000

© 1986 Association of American Medical Colleges