December 15, 2017 - Volume 42 - Issue 12 - Contributor Index

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Delirium monitoring and management in the acute care setting

Cullen, Elizabeth; Balas, Michele C.

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):37-42, December 15, 2017.

Associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, delirium is a syndrome commonly experienced by hospitalized adults. This article provides 10 suggestions for improving delirium assessment, prevention, and management.

Author:
Bowles, Kirklin

Drug updates and approvals: 2017 in review

Mospan, Geoffrey; Mospan, Cortney; Vance, Shayna; More

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):8-16, December 15, 2017.

In 2017, the FDA approved several new drugs for use in primary care. This article highlights the following new drugs: brodalumab (Siliq), dapagliflozin and saxagliptin (Qtern), dupilumab (Dupixent), oxymetazoline (Rhofade), safinamide (Xadago), and sarilumab (Kevzara).

Drug updates and approvals: 2017 in review

Mospan, Geoffrey; Mospan, Cortney; Vance, Shayna; More

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):8-16, December 15, 2017.

In 2017, the FDA approved several new drugs for use in primary care. This article highlights the following new drugs: brodalumab (Siliq), dapagliflozin and saxagliptin (Qtern), dupilumab (Dupixent), oxymetazoline (Rhofade), safinamide (Xadago), and sarilumab (Kevzara).

Anticoagulant options in atrial fibrillation: When new treatments become standard practice

Cole, Connie S.; Zimmerman, Richard

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):29-35, December 15, 2017.

Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have expanded options for treating patients with atrial fibrillation. However, DOACs are not warfarin substitutes, and NPs need to be aware of the difference.

Delirium monitoring and management in the acute care setting

Cullen, Elizabeth; Balas, Michele C.

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):37-42, December 15, 2017.

Associated with substantial morbidity and mortality, delirium is a syndrome commonly experienced by hospitalized adults. This article provides 10 suggestions for improving delirium assessment, prevention, and management.

Responding to child sexual abuse disclosure

Dolan, Carolyn M.; Raber, Micki S.

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):18-26, December 15, 2017.

In cases of child sexual abuse (CSA), NPs are faced with a variety of options dictated by community, agency, and individual resources. This article looks at victim-centered care from current guidelines and offers resources for clinical practice decision making when responding to CSA disclosure.

The STEADI toolkit: Incorporating a fall prevention guideline into the primary care setting

Mark, Janice A.; Loomis, Jo

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):50-55, December 15, 2017.

The CDC's STEADI toolkit was created to assist providers in screening and managing falls. This article introduces the toolkit and examines the process and importance of adopting it into routine clinical practice.

The STEADI toolkit: Incorporating a fall prevention guideline into the primary care setting

Mark, Janice A.; Loomis, Jo

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):50-55, December 15, 2017.

The CDC's STEADI toolkit was created to assist providers in screening and managing falls. This article introduces the toolkit and examines the process and importance of adopting it into routine clinical practice.

Author:
Meosky, Kalyn

Drug updates and approvals: 2017 in review

Mospan, Geoffrey; Mospan, Cortney; Vance, Shayna; More

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):8-16, December 15, 2017.

In 2017, the FDA approved several new drugs for use in primary care. This article highlights the following new drugs: brodalumab (Siliq), dapagliflozin and saxagliptin (Qtern), dupilumab (Dupixent), oxymetazoline (Rhofade), safinamide (Xadago), and sarilumab (Kevzara).

Drug updates and approvals: 2017 in review

Mospan, Geoffrey; Mospan, Cortney; Vance, Shayna; More

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):8-16, December 15, 2017.

In 2017, the FDA approved several new drugs for use in primary care. This article highlights the following new drugs: brodalumab (Siliq), dapagliflozin and saxagliptin (Qtern), dupilumab (Dupixent), oxymetazoline (Rhofade), safinamide (Xadago), and sarilumab (Kevzara).

Drug updates and approvals: 2017 in review

Mospan, Geoffrey; Mospan, Cortney; Vance, Shayna; More

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):8-16, December 15, 2017.

In 2017, the FDA approved several new drugs for use in primary care. This article highlights the following new drugs: brodalumab (Siliq), dapagliflozin and saxagliptin (Qtern), dupilumab (Dupixent), oxymetazoline (Rhofade), safinamide (Xadago), and sarilumab (Kevzara).

The menopausal woman: The need for an individualized plan of care

Pace, Diane Todd

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):43-49, December 15, 2017.

With life expectancy increasing, women will spend one-third of their lives in and beyond menopause. A collaborative discussion with the clinician facilitates informed decision-making.

Responding to child sexual abuse disclosure

Dolan, Carolyn M.; Raber, Micki S.

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):18-26, December 15, 2017.

In cases of child sexual abuse (CSA), NPs are faced with a variety of options dictated by community, agency, and individual resources. This article looks at victim-centered care from current guidelines and offers resources for clinical practice decision making when responding to CSA disclosure.

Author:
Vance, Shayna

Drug updates and approvals: 2017 in review

Mospan, Geoffrey; Mospan, Cortney; Vance, Shayna; More

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):8-16, December 15, 2017.

In 2017, the FDA approved several new drugs for use in primary care. This article highlights the following new drugs: brodalumab (Siliq), dapagliflozin and saxagliptin (Qtern), dupilumab (Dupixent), oxymetazoline (Rhofade), safinamide (Xadago), and sarilumab (Kevzara).

Anticoagulant options in atrial fibrillation: When new treatments become standard practice

Cole, Connie S.; Zimmerman, Richard

The Nurse Practitioner. 42(12):29-35, December 15, 2017.

Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) have expanded options for treating patients with atrial fibrillation. However, DOACs are not warfarin substitutes, and NPs need to be aware of the difference.