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JTI Blog
Current events in cardiopulmonary radiology, updates about the journal’s web site features, and links to other web sites of interest to cardiopulmonary radiologists.
Tuesday, November 11, 2014
The US Center for Medicare Services (CMS) has announced a favorable draft coverage decision for lung cancer screening. Click here for full details about the draft decision.
 
As noted in a recent JTI editorial, this decision is an important step toward narrowing the coverage gap for select seniors in the US at high risk for lung cancer. Click here to see a recent perspective on this topic by Dr. Mark Parker and colleagues.

Thursday, October 23, 2014

The November 2014 issue of JTI has been published in print and on-line. This issue contains several original scientific articles as well as other features.

This issue's Expert Opinion installment is entitled "SubmilliSievert Cardiothoracic CT Imaging in Daily Practice". Participants describe what can be achieved in low dose chest CT and briefly state how technology can aid in lowering dose.

V. Sharma and colleagues have written a review article entitled "Myocardial Tissue Characterization with Magnetic Resonance Imaging". This article first discusses the different signal characteristics and then reviews tissue characterization based on myocardial pathology. A variety of images nicely illustrate the various findings and patterns.

This issue's original articles have been highlighted in recent blog entries (10/15/2014 and 10/7/2014). The articles include:

  • "Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Predict Major Adverse Events in Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy" by K Hangman et al.
  • "Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy Versus Conventional Computed Tomography Guidance for Biopsy of Intrathoracic Lesions: A Retrospective Review of 1143 Consecutive Procedures" by J. Mammarappallil et al.
  • "Computed Tomography–guided Percutaneous Lung Biopsy: Impact of Lesion Proximity to Diaphragm on Biopsy Yield and Pneumothorax Rate" by C. Hague et al.
  • "Correlation Between EGFR Mutation Status and Computed Tomography Features in Patients With Advanced Pulmonary Adenocarcinoma" by J-S. Hsu et al.

The ACR Appropriateness Criteria for rib fractures have been updated by T. Henry and colleagues.

Web Exclusive content for this issue includes:

The next installment of the popular Signs in Cardiopulmonary Imaging series: the beak sign by P. Moullet and H. Mann.

Meeting notes from the Japanese Society of Thoracic Radiology. These case reports include:

  • Extranodal Marginal Zone Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue of the Central Bronchi by M. Ujita et al.
  • Familial Interstitial Pneumonia Complicated by Lung Cancer in 2 Sisters by A. Terada et al.
  • Cystic Tumor of the Atrioventricular Node: Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings by K. Suzuki et al.


Wednesday, October 15, 2014

Published ahead-of-print in JTI are three new original research articles.


M Patel and colleagues published their study entitled “Computed Tomography-guided Percutaneous Lung Biopsy: Impact of Lesion Proximity to Diaphragm on Biopsy Yield and Pneumothorax Rate”. The authors reviewed 174 lung biopsies in 168 patients and assessed diagnostic rates and rate of pneumothorax. The authors conclude that lesions closer to the diaphragm are associated with lower rate of diagnostic biopsy, but that there is no statistically significant difference in pneumothorax rate.


C Hague and colleagues’ study is entitled “Qualitative and Quantitative Assessment of Smoking-related Lung Disease: Effect of Iterative Reconstruction on Low-dose Computed Tomographic Examinations”. The authors conclude that with increasing levels of adaptive iterative reconstruction (ASIR), readers scored more respiratory bronchiolitis and emphysema decreased. Furthermore, detectable airways decreased but apparent airway wall thickness increased.


K. Hangman and colleagues’ article “Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings Predict Major Adverse Events in Apical Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy” reports findings of 93 consecutive patients with apical variant of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HMC). The authors found that the presence of an apical aneurysm and the extent of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) were both significant predictors of major adverse events (odds ratio 4.6 and 1.4 per 5% LGE, respectively). Patient who had both apical aneurysm and >5% LGE were at the highest risk for major adverse events (OR 6.7) and had the shortest event-free survival.


Tuesday, October 07, 2014
Published ahead of print in JTI are three new articles.

First is the next installment of Signs in Cardiopulmonary Imaging, the “Beak Sign”, by Paul Moullet and Howard Mann. This sign, which is found in the setting of aortic dissection, can be helpful in distinguishing between the true lumen and the false lumen.

The second article is a clinical perspective entitled “Lung Cancer Screening With Low-dose Computed Tomography: An Analysis of the MEDCAC Decision” by Dr. Mark Parker and colleagues. The authors explain the process of the MEDCAC review and provide point-by-point responses to the MEDCAC panel’s concerns of criticisms on the National Lung Screening trial.

The third article, entitled “Computed Tomography Fluoroscopy Versus Conventional Computed Tomography Guidance for Biopsy of Intrathoracic Lesions: Retrospective Review of 1143 Consecutive Procedures” by Dr. Joseph Mammarappallil and colleagues, compares the results of CT guided biopsies using conventional CT to CT fluoroscopy. The authors conclude that CT fluoroscopy results in improved technical success as the expense of increased patient radiation exposure as compared to using conventional CT guided needle biopsy.

Wednesday, August 27, 2014
The September 2014 issue of JTI has been published in print and online. This issue features a symposium on quality and safety in cardiothoracic imaging, guest edited by Dr. Jeffrey P. Kanne of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. The symposium consists of four review articles on topics readers should find relevant to their professional practices.

First Dr. Daniel Ocazionez and colleagues from the University of Washington have authored a review article focused on MRI safety in cardiothoracic imaging. Their article addresses implanted devices, pharmacologic agents, gadolinium contrast agents, external equipment, and anesthesia and sedation.

Second, Dr. Kanne reviews peer review in a broad context as well as addresses specific challenges in cardiothoracic imaging. This article discusses the various types of peer review with their respective advantages and disadvantages. This article is available for self-assessment CME (SA-CME) and counts toward the life-long learning requirements for Maintenance of Certification for the American Board of Radiology.

Third, Drs. Jacobo Kirsch and Daniel Vargas, from Cleveland Clinic Florida and the University of Colorado, respectively, write on cardiothoracic imaging guidelines in quality improvement. Appropriateness criteria, decision support tools, and physician certification are reviewed in the context of subspecialty cardiothoracic imaging.

Finally, Dr. Anne Leung of Stanford University concludes this symposium with a review of professionalism in radiology. One major theme in Dr. Leung’s review article is the importance of radiologists serving as stewards of medical imaging: acting as consultants to ensure that appropriate imaging is performed for appropriate indications. Dr. Leung’s article is also available for SA-CME credit.

Also included in this is of JTI is an expert opinion poll on challenges in peer review in cardiothoracic imaging, relevant to the topics in this symposium.

Previously mentioned published ahead-of-print articles are now in print including results of a survey of the membership of the Society of Thoracic Radiology on CT lung cancer screening. Furthermore, a joint practice parameter sponsored by the American College of Radiology and the Society of Thoracic Radiology on Performance and Reporting of Lung Cancer Screening Thoracic Computed Tomography is included in this issue.

An original research article on HRCT findings of microaspiration is published in this issue and is complemented by a pictorial essay on aspiration-related lung diseases.

Finally, web-exclusive content in this issue includes updated American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria on nontraumatic aortic disease and the latest installment of “Signs in Cardiopulmonary Imaging”: the Hammock Sign by Drs. Moore and Agarwal from the University of Michigan.
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Journal of Thoracic Imaging
Current events in cardiopulmonary radiology, updates about the journal?s web site features, and links to other web sites of interest to cardiopulmonary radiologists.