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Quantitative Analysis of Motion Artifacts in High-pitch Dual-source Computed Tomography of the Thorax

Schulz, Boris MD; Jacobi, Volkmar MD; Beeres, Martin MD; Bodelle, Boris MD; Gruber, Tatjana MD; Lee, Clara MD; Bauer, Ralf MD; Kerl, Matthias MD; Vogl, Thomas MD; Zangos, Stefan MD

doi: 10.1097/RTI.0b013e3182575729
Original Articles

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to objectively analyze motion artifacts on thoracic computed tomography (CT) with dual-source high-pitch and single-source techniques when using a no–breath-hold technique to examine patients who have difficulty complying with breath-holding instructions.

Materials and Methods: A total of 120 patients who received CT of the thorax with a free-breathing technique in single-source (16 slices and 128 slices; pitch=1.2) and dual-source (pitch=3.0) manners were evaluated retrospectively. In each of the 3 study groups, movements of the diaphragm and pulsations of the aortic root and main pulmonary artery were analyzed for their number and severity (blurred distance).

Results: No motion artifacts of the diaphragm were identified using a pitch of 3.0 (compared with n=14 for single-source CT using 128 slices and n=24 using 16-slice CT). In single-source examinations, the severity of artifacts was similar between 128-slice CT and 16-slice CT: blurring distance of the lung parenchyma due to diaphragm movements was 14 versus 16 mm, and double contours of the aorta were measured as 8 and 9 mm, respectively.

Conclusions: A high-pitch, dual-source mode is potentially advantageous for evaluating the lung parenchyma and vascular structures in patients who have difficulty complying with breath-holding instructions. Increasing from 16 to 128 slices can significantly reduce the number and severity of motion artifacts.

Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University, Frankfurt, Germany

Drs Ralf Bauer and Matthias Kerl are research consultants for Siemens AG and belong to the speakers bureau. The remaining authors declare no conflicts of interest.

Reprints: Boris Schulz, MD, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Clinic of the Goethe University, Haus 23 C UG, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany (e-mail: boris.schell@googlemail.com).

© 2012 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.