Prevalence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in Virginal Women

Tabrizi, Sepehr N. MSc, PhD*†; Fairley, Christopher K. MB, BS, FRACP, PhD‡§; Bradshaw, Catriona S. MB, BS, FAChSHM‡§; Garland, Suzanne M. MB, BS, FRCPA, FAChSHM, FRANZCOG*†

Sexually Transmitted Diseases:
doi: 10.1097/01.olq.0000216161.42272.be
Article
Abstract

Objectives: The objectives of this study was to determine the prevalence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in virginal women and to establish if nonpenetrative sexual activity is associated with these organisms.

Goal: The goal of this study was to assess prevalence of G. vaginalis and A. vaginae in virginal women.

Study Design: Forty-four virginal female patients self-collected tampon specimens, which were tested for G. vaginalis and A. vaginae by polymerase chain reaction, and provided either brief or detailed information regarding sexual practices by self-administered questionnaire.

Results: Twenty women (45%) had G. vaginalis and 3 (7%) A. vaginae detected. Among the 27 who provided detailed information, 12 (46%) had G. vaginalis and none had A. vaginae detected. G. vaginalis was significantly more likely to be detected in those who had participated in oral sex (odds ratio = 22; 95% confidence interval = 2.2–222) and hand-genital contact without penetration (P = 0.02), but not genital-genital contact.

Conclusion: This study shows that nonpenetrative intimate sexual contact is associated with carriage of G. vaginalis in virginal women.

In Brief

This study evaluated prevalence of Gardnerella vaginalis and Atopobium vaginae in virginal women and found nonpenetrative intimate sexual contact is associated with carriage of G. vaginalis.

Author Information

From the *Department of Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, The Royal Women's Hospital, Victoria, Australia; the †Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia; the ‡Melbourne Sexual Health Centre, The Alfred Hospital, Victoria, Australia; and the §School of Population Health, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

Correspondence: Sepehr N. Tabrizi, PhD, The Royal Women's Hospital, 132 Grattan St., Carlton, Victoria 3053, Australia. E-mail: Sepehr.Tabrizi@rch.org.au

Received for publication October 16, 2005, and accepted February 13, 2006.

© Copyright 2006 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association