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Sexually Transmitted Diseases:
doi: 10.1097/01.olq.0000199763.14766.2b
Article

High Prevalence of Sexually Transmitted Diseases Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Jiangsu Province, China

Jiang, Juan MD, PhD*; Cao, Ningxiao MD*; Zhang, Jinping BS*; Xia, Qiang MD, MPH†; Gong, Xiangdong MD, MS*; Xue, Huazhong MD*; Yang, Haitao MD‡; Zhang, Guocheng MD*; Shao, Changgeng MD*

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Author Information

From the *Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China; the † Neuropsychiatric Institute Center for Community Health, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California; and the ‡ Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, China

The study would not have been possible without the cooperation of the respondents who were willing to participant in the study. The authors thank the gay bar owners/managers for their assistance.

Support for this study was provided by the Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College.

Correspondence: Juan Jiang, MD, PhD, Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, 12 Jiangwangmiao Street, Nanjing 210042, China. E-mail: drjjiang@yahoo.com.

Received for publication May 17, 2005, and accepted July 5, 2005.

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Abstract

Objective: The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV infection, and sexual risk behaviors among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Jiangsu Province, China.

Design: The authors conducted a cross-sectional study.

Methods: From February to July 2003, men who attended 10 participating gay bars in five cities in Jiangsu Province were asked to complete a self-administered questionnaire, including measures of alcohol use and sexual risk behaviors. Blood samples and urethral swabs were taken to examine the presence of STDs, including HIV infection.

Results: A total of 144 men were recruited in the study. Forty-six percent of men reported unprotected anal intercourse with their male sexual partners in the past 3 months. No one was found to be HIV-infected, but the prevalence of STDs was high: gonorrhea 2.7%, chlamydial infection 8.0%, nonchlamydial nongonococcal urethritis 27.7%, active syphilis 6.9%, hepatitis B virus infection 9.1%, herpes simplex virus-2 infection 7.8%, and genital warts 13.2%.

Conclusions: Given that HIV prevalence among MSM in some other parts of China has been as high as 3%, STDs facilitate the transmission of HIV, and high prevalence of STDs and sexual risk behaviors among MSM exist in Jiangsu Province, the potential for the future spread of HIV is of concern, and it is urgent to provide MSMs with STD healthcare services and HIV/AIDS/STD prevention education and intervention.

SEXUALLY TRANSMITTED DISEASES (STDs) were reportedly eliminated in China in 19641,2 but have had a significant resurgence since the early 1980s.3,4 Between 1989 and 1998, the number of newly infected STD cases nationwide was increased by approximately 20% per year.5 In 2002, a total of 744,848 new STD cases (gonorrhea, syphilis, nongonococcal urethritis [NGU], genital herpes, genital warts, chancroid, and lymphogranuloma venereum [LGV]) were reported to the Chinese National Center for AIDS/STD Prevention and Control.6 The majority of STD cases were infected through unprotected sexual contact with their heterosexual partners.3–6

In late 2002, the Chinese government acknowledged that more than one million people in China had become infected with HIV.7 Approximately 220,000 people had already died of AIDS since the first case in China was diagnosed in June 1985, and 840,000 people were living with HIV at the end of 2002, giving a prevalence among the general population somewhere between 0.06% and 0.07%.8 By the end of September 2004, the cumulative number of reported HIV-positive cases was 89,067 with significant increases in reported infections since 2002.8 Needle sharing among drug users was the dominant transmission route of HIV,8–11 and only 17,813 cases or 0.2% of all confirmed HIV/AIDS cases were men who have sex with men (MSM).8 The United Nations Program on AIDS (UNAIDS) projects China could have between 10 and 15 million HIV cases by 2010 unless effective prevention measures are taken.12

Some cross-sectional studies have documented high STD prevalence among MSM in China with syphilis ranging from 9.04% to 20.8%,13,14 low HIV prevalence ranging from 0% to 3.1%,14–18 and common sexual risk behaviors such as multiple sexual partners and unprotected anal intercourse (UAI).19–23

Jiangsu is one of the most densely populated provinces in China with 74.4 million people and located at the eastern part of the Yangtze River Delta, next to Shanghai.24 By the end of 2000, a total of 106 HIV cases had been reported since the first case was detected in 1991.25 In 2004, 78,178 new STD cases were reported in Jiangsu Province with a 34% increase compared with 58,302 in 2003.26 In this article, we report the prevalence of STDs, including HIV infection, and sexual risk behaviors among MSM in Jiangsu Province using a convenience sample of men recruited from gay bars.

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Methods

Sampling and Recruitment

All gay bars in five cities (Nanjing, Yangzhou, Changzhou, Wuxi, and Suzhou) in Jiangsu Province were identified through key informant interviews during informative research. After obtaining agreements from the owners/managers, a survey of MSM was conducted between February and July 2003 in 10 of 17 gay bars.

Every Friday night during the study period, except for a 10-week gap between March and May resulting from severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) outbreak in China, researchers from the Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, visited a gay bar and approached men who appeared to be 18 or older and invited them to participate in the study as part of an HIV/AIDS/STD education program. Men who were 18 years of age or older and had ever had sex with a male in the past were eligible for the study.

Men who agreed to participate in the study were asked to complete a short anonymous, self-administered questionnaire after the researchers introduced the study and obtained the written informed consents. Questions covered sociodemographic characteristics, history of STDs, alcohol use, and sexual risk behaviors. Men who reported having had insertive and/or receptive anal intercourse with their male sexual partners in the past 3 months but failed to report consistent condom use were considered engaging UAI. After participants completed the questionnaire, the researchers used the manager’s office to perform a genital examination to check for the presence of urethral discharge, genital ulcers, and genital warts. Genital warts were diagnosed by direct visual examination applying acetic acid to the areas of suspected infection. A urethral swab and a blood sample were also taken for detecting the presence of STD and HIV infection. Study participants and men who were not willing to participate in the study were provided HIV/AIDS/STD counseling and education individually or in a small group.

All participants were assigned a unique study identification number and given a telephone number and time they could call for their test results. Participants identified themselves on the telephone by identification number only. Men who tested positive for bacterial STD (gonorrhea, chlamydial infection, syphilis, or NGU) or genital warts were referred for treatment at the STD Service Center in the Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, and those who tested positive for other viral STD (hepatitis B virus [HBV], hepatitis C virus [HCV], herpes simplex virus-2 [HSV-2], or HIV infection) were provided counseling over the phone by a trained counselor.

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Laboratory Testing

Urethral swabs were tested by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the presence of Neisseria gonorrhea and Chlamydia trachomatis using the Amplicor CT/NG test (Roche Diagnostics, Branchburg, NJ). This assay was also used to monitor PCR inhibition with an internal control (IC) provided in the kit. Ureaplasma urealyticum, Mycoplasma hominis, and Mycoplasma genitalium were detected by an in-house nested PCR with primers deduced from 16S rRNA gene sequence.27 The outer set of primers could detect Mycoplasmas species and U. urealyticum while avoiding crossreaction with other common bacterial species. The sequence of the forward primer was 5′-GAG TTT GAT CCT GGC TCA GC-3′ and the reverse primer 5′-ATT ACC GCG ACT GCT GGC AC-3′. Five microliters of DNA was added to 15 microliters of 1* PCR buffer (1 U Taq DNA polymerase, Promega; 1.5 mmol/L MgCl2; 0.5 mol/L of each primer; 200 mol/L dATP, dGTP, and dCTP). The PCR was performed with the GeneAmp PCR System 9600 (Applied Biosystem, Foster City, CA) under the following conditions: 93°C for 30 seconds (denaturation), 55°C for 30 seconds (annealing), and 72°C for 60 seconds (elongation) for 35 cycles. To improve the efficiency of PCR, a series of inner sets of primers were used for nested PCR. For U. urealyticum, the forward primer was 5′-GCG GCA TGC CTA ATA CAT GCA-3′ and the reverse primer 5′-CTT ATT CAA ATG GTA CAG TCA AAC-3′. For M. hominis, the forward primer was 5′-CAA TGG CTA ATG CCG GAT ACG-3′ and the reverse primer 5′-GGT ACC GTC AGT CTG CAA-3′. For M. genitalium, the forward primer was 5′-GCC ATA TCA GCT AGT TGG T-3′ and the reverse primer 5′-CTC CAG CCT TTG CCT GCT A-3′. The first PCR product was diluted 10 times and 5 L of the dilute product was added to 15 microliters of 1* PCR buffer (1 U Taq DNA polymerase; Promega; 1.5 mmol/L MgCl2; 0.5 mol/L of each primer; 200 mol/L dATP, dGTP, and dCTP). The PCR was performed under the following conditions: 93°C for 30 seconds (denaturation), 55°C for 30 seconds (annealing), and 72°C for 60 seconds (elongation) for 35 cycles. Amplicons were visualized after electrophoresis on 2% agarose gel and observed under Gel Doc EQ System (Bio-Rad, Hercules, CA). The expected length of amplified fragment was 456 bp for U. urealyticum, 335 bp for M. hominis, and 241 bp for M. genitalium. Positive results of M. genitalium were confirmed with the amplicon nucleotide sequencing (TaKaRa Biotechnology, Dalian, China).

Blood samples were tested for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) by enzyme immunoassay (EIA; Shanghai Kehua Biotechnology Ltd., Shanghai, China); syphilis was detected by treponema pallidum particle agglutination assay (TPPA; Fujirebio Diagnostics Inc., Tokyo, Japan) and rapid plasma region (RPR; Xinjiang Xinde Co., Xinjiang, China); the presence of HIV antibodies was demonstrated by EIA (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL), and positive results were confirmed by Western blot (Abbott Laboratories, Abbott Park, IL); antibodies to HCV were detected by EIA (Shanghai Kehua Biotechnology Ltd., Shanghai, China); and antibodies to HSV-2 were detected by HSV-2 IgG enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA; Focus Technologies, Cypress, CA). Western blot was performed in the HIV Confirmatory Laboratory at Jiangsu Provincial Center for Disease Control and Prevention, and all the other tests were performed in the STD Reference Laboratory at Chinese National Center for STD & Leprosy Control and Prevention in Nanjing.

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Statistical Analysis

Descriptive analyses were conducted to illustrate the sociodemographic characteristics, alcohol use, sexual orientation, sexual risk behaviors, and prevalence of STDs, including HIV infection. Bivariate analyses were performed to assess the risk factors associated with UAI and newly acquired STDs. Unlike viral infections, bacterial STD such as gonorrhea, chlamydial infection, and syphilis were more likely acquired within months. Assessing the risk factors of these newly acquired infections would help us find some potential predictors for future infections, including HIV. In our study, men who tested positive for gonorrhea, chlamydial infection, or active syphilis (TPPA positive and RPR titer ≥1:8) were considered cases of newly acquired STDs. Adjusted odds ratios (AOR) were also computed using multivariate logistic regression models to evaluate risk factors associated with UAI and newly acquired STDs controlling for age, education, and marital status. All statistical analyses were performed using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) software version 8.02 for Windows.28

The study protocol was reviewed and approved by the Institutional Review Board (IRB) at the Institute of Dermatology, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College.

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Results

A total of 167 men were approached during the study period, and 144 agreed to participate giving a participation rate of 86.2%. Table 1 shows the sociodemographic characteristics, alcohol use, and sexual risk behaviors of the sample. Approximately half (49.3%) men were between 18 and 29 years, and 49.5% received some college or higher education. Forty-one men (28.5%) were married and living with their wives; and 12.5% were separated or divorced. Approximately one in five (18.2%) men were considered heavy drinkers, who frequently consumed five or more drinks in the past 3 months.

Table 1
Table 1
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The Kinsey scale was used to define men’s sexual orientation.29 A total of 83 (58.1%) men identified as exclusively homosexual or predominantly homosexual, whereas 31 (21.7%) men identified as predominantly heterosexual with only incidentally homosexual encounters. Only 17.0% of the men had their first sex encounter with another male before age 18.

In the past 3 months, 94.4% of participants were sexually active with men and 45.5% had sex with women. Approximately two in five (41.3%) men had sex with both men and women. Fifty (34.7%) men reported four or more male sexual partners, and nine (6.3%) men reported four or more female sexual partners. More than half (55.2%) of the men reported having insertive or receptive anal intercourse with men, and 83.5% (66 of 79) of them reported UAI.

Among 112 men who provided a urethral swab, one man was diagnosed with gonorrhea, seven with C. trachomatis infection, and two with coinfection of N. gonorrhea and C. trachomatis. One fourth (27.7%) of the men were diagnosed with nonchlamydial nongonococcal urethritis showing the presence of at least one of the following pathogens: U. urealyticum, M. hominis, and M. genitalium (Table 2).

Table 2
Table 2
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Six men who reported negative test results for HIV, syphilis, and HBV tests during recent blood donations and refused to provide blood sample for the study were considered negative for all these three infections without drawing blood for additional confirmatory testing. A blood sample was taken from the remaining 138 men to test for HIV, syphilis, HBV, HCV, and HSV-2 infections. No one tested positive for HIV or HCV infections. The prevalence of syphilis seropositivity was 18.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 12.7–26.1) with a positive TPPA test result, and the prevalence of active syphilis was 6.9% (95% CI: 3.4–12.4) with a positive TPPA test result and RPR titer of 1:8 or higher (Table 2).

Table 3 shows that UAI was not associated with age or educational background. Although not statistical significant at the level of 0.05, men who were divorced or separated from their wives, heavy drinkers, and men who had their first sex with a male before age 18 were more likely to engage in UAI with their male sexual partners. Both bivariate and multivariate analyses showed that men with four or more male sexual partners in the past 3 months were more likely to report UAI (OR = 3.09, 95% CI: 1.51–6.31; AOR = 3.34, 95% CI: 1.60–6.99).

Table 3
Table 3
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Men with a separated/divorced marital status was the only statistical significant (P <0.01) factor associated with newly acquired STDs. In bivariate analyses (data not shown in tables), men with a separated/divorced marital status were more likely to engage in UAI with male sexual partners (OR = 2.67; 95% CI: 0.91–7.78; P = 0.07) without reporting more male sexual partners (OR = 0.81; 95% CI: 0.28–2.38; P = 0.70) compared with those who never married. Heavy drinkers, men who had their first sex with another male before age 18, having four or more male sexual partners, and engaging in UAI with male sexual partners showed some trend in association with newly acquired STDs, but none was statistically significant.

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Discussion

Since the late 1980s, China’s National STD Sentinel Surveillance Program has been monitoring the prevalence of STDs among four population groups: female sex workers, long-distance truck drivers, blood donors, and antenatal clinic attendees,30 whereas China’s National HIV Sentinel Surveillance Program has been tracking the prevalence of HIV among six population groups since 1995, including females sex workers, drug users, long-distance truck drivers, pregnant women, STD clinic attendees, and blood donors.31 Neither of these two programs include MSMs. Limited information from some cross-sectional studies have shown high STD prevalence, low but significant HIV prevalence, and sexual risk behaviors among MSMs in some parts of China based on samples recruited through various methods: online sampling,13 peer recruitment,17,18,21 and gay bar recruitment.14 To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study in Jiangsu Province to investigate the prevalence of STDs, including HIV infection, and risk behaviors among MSMs.

Our study documented a high prevalence of STD among MSM in Jiangsu Province: gonorrhea 2.7%, chlamydial infection 8.0%, nonchlamydial nongonococcal urethritis 27.7%, active syphilis 6.9%, HBV infection 9.1%, HSV-2 infection 7.8%, and genital warts 13.2%. Different from the studies conducted in other parts of China, we did not find anyone with HIV infection. This could be explained by the lack of statistical power as a result of our limited sample size (n = 144) or a different HIV epidemic scenario among MSM in Jiangsu Province. By the end of 2000, only 106 HIV-infected cases had been reported with the majority of injection drug users and paid plasma donors in Jiangsu Province with 74.4 million people.25 HIV epidemic among MSM in Jiangsu Province might be at its very beginning stage with a very low HIV prevalence. However, this should be regarded with extreme caution before a population-based study is conducted. Six participants refused to provide their blood samples for HIV testing saying they had a negative HIV test result during a recent blood donation. If the actual reason for some of them was that they had already found out they were HIV-infected and did not want the researcher to know their HIV infection status, although anonymity and confidentiality were assured, it would make the HIV prevalence in our sample similar to some other studies.16,18 Although we did not find anyone who was HIV-positive, the 95% CI (0–2.5%) of HIV prevalence in our sample still overlapped the point estimate (1.35%) reported by a recent study carried out in Northeastern China (Dr. Yuhua Wu, personal communication, April 2005).

Consistent with other studies,13–23 our sample reported a high level of sexual risk behaviors among MSM. One third of men reported four or more male sexual partners, and almost half (46.2%) of the men reported engaging in UAI with their male sexual partners in the past 3 months. Although the questions did not appear in the questionnaire, we asked some participants about the reasons for not using condoms. Their answers included, “I don’t think I am at risk of HIV infection since I have never heard of anyone around me to be infected”; “I know my partner very well”; “If I insist on using a condom, my partner may think I have an infection and he may not want to have sex with me”; and “Condoms were not handy when I wanted to have sex.” Given the high prevalence of STD and sexual risk behaviors, it is urgent to develop targeted intervention programs to correct their misconceptions about HIV and condom use, and promote condom use before the spread of HIV infection in this group.

Because of traditional values about family and marriage in China, many MSM eventually get married and have children. Many men conceal their homosexuality from society and their families. It is quite common among MSM in China to be sexually active with both men and women.16,17,19 In our sample, 41.0% of all age groups and 76.7% of men over 30 were once married, and 41.3% reported having sex with both men and women in the past 3 months. This suggests that heterosexual transmission of HIV infection between MSM and their female sexual partners should be emphasized in any HIV intervention. We found that separated/divorced men were more likely to report UAI and test positive in newly acquired STDs. Further research is needed to investigate this group and develop targeted interventions tailored to their needs.

Although statistical power to detect risk factors associated with UAI was limited as a result of our small sample size (n = 144), some trends can be seen that heavy drinkers, men who had their first sex encounter with another male before age 18, and men with four or more male sexual partners were more likely to engage in UAI. The information will be very useful in developing our HIV intervention programs to reduce UAI in this group.

We considered men who were tested positive for gonorrhea, chlamydial infection, or active syphilis (TPPA positive and RPR titer ≥1:8) as cases of newly acquired STDs. Evaluating the risk factors of newly acquired STDs may help us understand who may be at high risk of future infection, including HIV. Heavy drinkers, first sex encounter with a male before age 18, four or more male sexual partners, and UAI are risk factors of newly acquired STDs. HIV/AIDS interventions need to identify men with these factors and provide them with targeted HIV/AIDS education and STD treatment to reduce their chance of being infected with HIV. Newly acquired STDs can also be used as an indicator of sexual risk behaviors to evaluate the effectiveness of HIV/AIDS intervention programs, especially at the early stage of HIV epidemic in this group.

Because all participants were recruited from gay bars, the results of our study may not be generalizable to the larger MSM community. One ethnographic study conducted in Beijing reported that MSM who visited gay bars were mostly middle class, and segments of MSM socialized separately and rarely mixed.32 Our study showed some evidence of their socioeconomic status (SES) and almost half (49.5%) of our sample received some college or higher education, whereas the percentage is only 3.92% for the general population in Jiangsu Province.24 Limitations of this study also include selection bias resulting from convenience sampling strategy and the lack of statistical power resulting from limited sample size. Despite these limitations, our study still provides valuable HIV/STD information about MSM in Jiangsu Province that have never been studied before. Because no significant differences were reported among men visiting different gay bars and a high response rate (86.2%) may suggest good representativeness of our sample, the results may be generalizable to gay bar attendees in Jiangsu Province. The intention of our study was to provide preliminary data on the prevalence of STDs, including HIV infection, and sexual risk behaviors among MSM in Jiangsu Province, and use these preliminary findings to support a larger study using a probability sample, which will help us better understand the population and develop more appropriate interventions.

STDs and high-risk sexual behaviors (multiple males sexual partners and UAI) were prevalent among MSM in Jiangsu Province. Although we did not find anyone infected with HIV, given the facts that HIV prevalence among MSM in other parts of China has been as high as 3%,18 STDs facilitate the transmission of HIV,33–35 and the high prevalence of STDs and sexual risk behaviors exist in this group, the potential for future spread of HIV is of a concern, and it is urgent to provide them STD services (diagnosis and treatment) and HIV/AIDS/STD prevention education and interventions.

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He, Q; Wang, Y; Lin, P; Raymond, HF; Li, Y; Yang, F; Zhao, J; Li, J; Ling, L; McFarland, W
Sexually Transmitted Infections, 85(5): 383-390.
10.1136/sti.2009.035808
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Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health
Hiv Infection and Mental Health of "Money Boys": A Pilot Study in Shandong Province, China
Tao, XR; Gai, RY; Zhang, N; Zheng, W; Zhang, XF; Xu, AQ; Li, SX
Southeast Asian Journal of Tropical Medicine and Public Health, 41(2): 358-368.

Journal of Infection
Changes in HIV prevalence and sexual behavior among men who have sex with men in a northern Chinese city: 2002-2006
Zhang, DP; Bi, P; Iv, F; Zhang, J; HIiller, JE
Journal of Infection, 55(5): 456-463.
10.1016/j.jinf.2007.06.015
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International Journal of Std & AIDS
Herpes simplex virus-2 infection in male rural migrants in Shanghai, China
He, N; Cao, H; Yin, Y; Gao, M; Zhang, T; Detels, R
International Journal of Std & AIDS, 20(2): 112-114.
10.1258/ijsa.2008.008217
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Jaids-Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Prevalence and Correlates of HIV and Syphilis Infections Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Seven Provinces in China With Historically Low HIV Prevalence
Xiao, Y; Sun, JP; Li, CM; Lu, F; Allen, KL; Vermund, SH; Jia, YJ
Jaids-Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 53(): S66-S73.

Lancet
Syphilis in China: results of a national surveillance programme
Chen, ZQ; Zhang, GC; Gong, XD; Lin, C; Gao, X; Liang, GJ; Yue, XL; Chen, XS; Cohen, MS
Lancet, 369(): 132-138.

Bmc Public Health
The characterisation of sexual behaviour in Chinese male university students who have sex with other men: A cross-sectional study
Cong, L; Ono-Kihara, M; Xu, G; Ma, Q; Pan, X; Zhang, D; Homma, T; Kihara, M
Bmc Public Health, 8(): -.
ARTN 250
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AIDS and Behavior
Risk Factors for Syphilis and Prevalence of HIV, Hepatitis B and C among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Beijing, China: Implications for HIV Prevention
Ruan, YH; Luo, FJ; Jia, YJ; Li, XX; Li, QC; Liang, HY; Zhang, XX; Li, DL; Shi, W; Freeman, JM; Vermund, SH; Shao, YM
AIDS and Behavior, 13(4): 663-670.
10.1007/s10461-008-9503-0
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Plos Medicine
Elevated risk for HIV infection among men who have sex with men in low- and middle-income countries 2000-2006: A systematic review
Baral, S; Sifakis, F; Cleghorn, F; Beyrer, C
Plos Medicine, 4(): 1901-1911.
ARTN e339
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Tuberculosis
Co-infection with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis in Asia
Vermund, SH; Yammoto, N
Tuberculosis, 87(): S18-S25.
10.1016/j.tube.2007.05.008
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Sexually Transmitted Infections
Meta-analysis: prevalence of HIV infection and syphilis among MSM in China
Gao, L; Zhang, L; Jin, Q
Sexually Transmitted Infections, 85(5): 354-358.
10.1136/sti.2008.034702
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AIDS Patient Care and Stds
Willingness to Be Circumcised for Preventing HIV among Chinese Men Who Have Sex with Men
Ruan, YH; Qian, HZ; Li, DL; Shi, W; Li, QC; Liang, HY; Yang, Y; Luo, FJ; Vermund, SH; Shao, YM
AIDS Patient Care and Stds, 23(5): 315-321.
10.1089/apc.2008.0199
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AIDS and Behavior
HIV prevalence and correlates of unprotected anal intercourse among men who have sex with men, Jinan, China
Ruan, SM; Yang, H; Zhu, YW; Ma, YH; Li, JX; Zhao, JK; McFarland, W; Raymond, HF
AIDS and Behavior, 12(3): 469-475.
10.1007/s10461-008-9361-9
CrossRef
Sexually Transmitted Infections
Epidemiology of male same-sex behaviour and associated sexual health indicators in low- and middle-income countries: 2003-2007 estimates
Caceres, CF; Konda, K; Segura, ER; Lyerla, R
Sexually Transmitted Infections, 84(): I49-I56.
10.1136/sti.2008.030569
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Sexually Transmitted Infections
Internet use and risk behaviours: an online survey of visitors to three gay websites in China
Zhang, D; Bi, P; Lv, F; Tang, H; Zhang, J; Hiller, JE
Sexually Transmitted Infections, 83(7): 571-576.
10.1136/sti.2007.026138
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AIDS
Characterization of HIV-1 subtypes and viral antiretroviral drug resistance in men who have sex with men in Beijing, China
Zhang, XY; Li, SW; Li, XX; Li, XX; Xu, JQ; Li, DL; Ruan, YH; Xing, H; Zhang, XX; Shao, YM
AIDS, 21(): S59-S65.

Sexually Transmitted Infections
Prevalence of syphilis and HIV infections among men who have sex with men from different settings in Shenzhen, China: implications for HIV/STD surveillance
Hong, FC; Zhou, H; Cai, YM; Pan, P; Feng, TJ; Liu, XL; Chen, XS
Sexually Transmitted Infections, 85(1): 42-44.
10.1136/sti.2008.031682
CrossRef
Lancet
Evolution of China's response to HIV/AIDS
Wu, ZY; Sullivan, SG; Wang, Y; Rotheram-Borus, M; Detels, R
Lancet, 369(): 679-690.

JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Incidence of HIV-1, Syphilis, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C Virus Infections and Predictors Associated With Retention in a 12-Month Follow-Up Study Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Beijing, China
Ruan, Y; Jia, Y; Zhang, X; Liang, H; Li, Q; Yang, Y; Li, D; Zhou, Z; Luo, F; Shi, W; Shao, Y
JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 52(5): 604-610.
10.1097/QAI.0b013e3181b31f5c
PDF (106) | CrossRef
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
HIV Incidence and Associated Factors in a Cohort of Men Who Have Sex With Men in Nanjing, China
Yang, H; Hao, C; Huan, X; Yan, H; Guan, W; Xu, X; Zhang, M; Tang, W; Wang, N; Lau, JT
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 37(4): 208-213.
10.1097/OLQ.0b013e3181d13c59
PDF (211) | CrossRef
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
The Epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, Sexually Transmitted Infections, and Associated Risk Behaviors Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in the Mekong Subregion and China: Implications for Policy and Programming
de Lind van Wijngaarden, JW; Brown, T; Girault, P; Sarkar, S; van Griensven, F
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 36(5): 319-324.
10.1097/OLQ.0b013e318195c302
PDF (205) | CrossRef
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Prevalence and Correlates of HIV and Syphilis Infections Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Chongqing Municipality, China
Xiao, Y; Ding, X; Li, C; Liu, J; Sun, J; Jia, Y
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 36(10): 647-656.
10.1097/OLQ.0b013e3181aac23d
PDF (367) | CrossRef
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Sexually Transmitted Diseases and Risk Behaviors Among Market Vendors in China
LIN, C; HSIEH, J; THE NIMH COLLABORATIVE HIV/STD PREVENTION TRIAL GROUP, ; WU, Z; ROTHERAM-BORUS, MJ; LI, L; GUAN, J; DETELS, R; YIN, Y; WU, S; LIU, Z
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 34(12): 1030-1034.
10.1097/OLQ.0b013e318141fe89
PDF (177) | CrossRef
Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Rapidly Increasing Prevalence of HIV and Syphilis and HIV-1 Subtype Characterization Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Jiangsu, China
Guo, H; Wei, J; Yang, H; Huan, X; Tsui, SK; Zhang, C
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 36(2): 120-125.
10.1097/OLQ.0b013e31818d3fa0
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JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
Trends in Prevalence of HIV, Syphilis, Hepatitis C, Hepatitis B, and Sexual Risk Behavior Among Men Who Have Sex With Men: Results of 3 Consecutive Respondent-Driven Sampling Surveys in Beijing, 2004 Through 2006
Ma, X; Zhang, Q; He, X; Sun, W; Yue, H; Chen, S; Raymond, HF; Li, Y; Xu, M; Du, H; McFarland, W
JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 45(5): 581-587.
10.1097/QAI.0b013e31811eadbc
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JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
The Influence of Social and Sexual Networks in the Spread of HIV and Syphilis Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Shanghai, China
Choi, K; Ning, Z; Gregorich, SE; Pan, Q
JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 45(1): 77-84.
10.1097/QAI.0b013e3180415dd7
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JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes
High HIV Prevalence Detected in 2006 and 2007 Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in China's Largest Municipality: An Alarming Epidemic in Chongqing, China
Feng, L; Ding, X; Lu, R; Liu, J; Sy, A; Ouyang, L; Pan, C; Yi, H; Liu, H; Xu, J; Zhao, J
JAIDS Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes, 52(1): 79-85.
10.1097/QAI.0b013e3181a4f53e
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Sexually Transmitted Diseases
Relationship Between Syphilis and HIV Infections Among Men Who Have Sex With Men in Beijing, China
Ruan, Y; Li, D; Li, X; Qian, H; Shi, W; Zhang, X; Yang, Z; Zhang, X; Wang, C; Liu, Y; Yu, M; Xiao, D; Hao, C; Xing, H; Hong, K; Shao, Y
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, 34(8): 592-597.
10.1097/01.olq.0000253336.64324.ef
PDF (208) | CrossRef
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