Prostate-Specific Antigen is Unlikely to Be a Suitable Biomarker of Semen Exposure From Recent Unprotected Receptive Anal Intercourse in Men Who Have Sex With Men

Rice, Cara E. MPH*; Gallo, Maria F. PhD*; Hobbs, Marcia M. PhD; Lynch, Courtney D. PhD§; Norris, Alison H. MD, PhD*‡; Davis, John A. MD, PhD; Fields, Karen S. RN, BSN; Ervin, Melissa (MT) ASCP; Turner, Abigail Norris PhD*‡

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: June 2014 - Volume 41 - Issue 6 - p 377–379
doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0000000000000129
Note

Abstract: A biomarker of unprotected receptive anal intercourse could improve validity of sexual behavior measurement. We quantified prostate-specific antigen (PSA) from rectal swabs from men who have sex with men (MSM). One swab was PSA positive. Using current methods, PSA is an inadequate biomarker of recent unprotected receptive anal intercourse in men who have sex with men.

Prostate-specific antigen, collected via rectal swab, is an inadequate biomarker of recent unprotected receptive anal intercourse among men who have sex with men.

From the *Division of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; †Division of Infectious Diseases, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC; ‡Division of Infectious Diseases and §Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, College of Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH; and ¶Sexual Health Clinic, Columbus Public Health, Columbus, OH

The authors thank Mysheika Williams Roberts, Jose Bazan, Maurizio Macaluso, Abigail Shoben, and the Division of Infectious Diseases at The Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University for their support of this project. The authors thank the clinicians from Columbus Public Health SHC and study volunteers (Alexandra Medoro, Aliza Spaeth-Cook, Angela Palmer-Wackerly, Chelsea Muyskens, Courtney Maierhofer, Julie Anderson, Laura Drew, Samantha Lahey, and Tiffany Wang) for their assistance with data collection and Dana Lapple for prostate-specific antigen testing.

This project was supported by the Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science (OSU CCTS). The Ohio State University Center for Clinical and Translational Science is supported by the National Center for Research Resources (Grant UL1RR025755) and is now at the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (Grant 8UL1TR000090-05), the Alumni Grant for Graduate Research and Scholarship, and The Ohio State University Presidential Fellowship. Laboratory activities for the study were supported in part by the Southeastern Sexually Transmitted Infections Cooperative Research Center funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (Grant U19-AI031496). The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences or the National Institutes of Health.

No conflicts of interest were declared.

Correspondence: Cara E. Rice, MPH, 1144 N Doan Hall, OSU 410 West 10th Ave, Columbus, OH 43210. E-mail: rice.477@osu.edu.

Received for publication December 16, 2013, and accepted March 13, 2014.

© Copyright 2014 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association