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Lymphogranuloma Venereum Causing a Persistent Genital Ulcer

Marcotte, Terrence NP, MSN*; Lee, Yer BS; Pandori, Mark PhD; Jain, Vivek MD*‡; Cohen, Stephanie Elise MD, MPH†‡

Sexually Transmitted Diseases: April 2014 - Volume 41 - Issue 4 - p 280–282
doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0000000000000104
Case Report

Abstract: Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a sexually transmitted cause of inguinal lymphadenopathy and proctocolitis. We report a patient with a persistent genital ulcer due to LGV (serovar L2b), an unusual presentation among US men who have sex with men. Lymphogranuloma venereum should be considered when evaluating persistent genital ulcers, and LGV-specific testing should be sought.

We describe a case report of a patient who developed a persistent penile ulcer due to lymphogranuloma venereum. We discuss lymphogranuloma venereum epidemiology and present diagnostic and therapeutic considerations.

From the *HIV/AIDS Division, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California, San Francisco, CA; †Disease Prevention and Control Branch, Population Health Division, San Francisco Department of Public Health, San Francisco, CA; and ‡Division of Infectious Diseases, University of California, San Francisco, CA.

Acknowledgments. The authors acknowledge the generous participation of the affected patient in the preparation of this report.

Funding. None to report.

Conflict of interest: None declared.

Terrence Marcotte and Yer Lee Joint first authors.

Correspondence: Stephanie Cohen, MD, MPH, San Francisco City Clinic, Disease Prevention and Control Branch, Population Health Division, San Francisco, Department of Public Health, 356 7th Street, San Francisco, CA 94103. E-mail: Stephanie.cohen@sfdph.org.

Alternate corresponding author: Terrence Marcotte, NP, MSN, Positive Health Program, HIV/AIDS Division, San Francisco General Hospital, University of California, San Francisco, Box 0874, San Francisco, CA 94143-0874. E-mail: tmarcotte@php.ucsf.edu.

Received for publication November 17, 2013, and accepted January 2, 2014.

© Copyright 2014 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association