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Sexually Transmitted Diseases:
doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0b013e31827fd4d4
Original Study

Evaluation of Harm Reduction Programs on Seroincidence of HIV, Hepatitis B and C, and Syphilis Among Intravenous Drug Users in Southwest China

Ruan, Yuhua PhD*; Liang, Shu MD; Zhu, Junling MD*; Li, Xudong MD*‡; Pan, Stephen W. MS§; Liu, Qianping MD; Song, Benli MD; Wang, Qixing MD; Xing, Hui MS*; Shao, Yiming MD, PhD*

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Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a multifaceted harm reduction program by comparing seroincidence rates of HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), and syphilis before and after implementation of harm reduction strategies among intravenous drug users (IDUs) in a drug-trafficking city in Southwest China.

Design: This is a prospective cohort study with 24 months of follow-up.

Methods: Two prospective cohorts (cohort 2002–2004 and cohort 2006–2008) were followed up every 6 months for seroconversions of HIV, HCV, and syphilis antibodies and HBV surface antigen.

Results: After implementation of harm reduction strategies in Xichang city, Sichuan province, the HIV incidence rate among IDUs significantly dropped from 2.5 to 0.6 cases per 100 person-years. Subanalyses also indicated that the incidence rate of HBV significantly declined from 14.2 to 8.8 cases per 100 person-years. No significant changes in the seroincidence rates of HCV or syphilis were detected after implementation of IDU harm reduction strategies.

Conclusions: Harm reduction strategies may help reduce the high incidence of certain blood-borne infectious diseases and sexual transmitted diseases among high-risk IDUs in southwest China. Additional research is needed on the implementation and evaluation of harm reduction strategies in China.

© Copyright 2013 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association

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