Hepatitis B Virus Infection Risk Factors and Immunity Among Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic Clients

Trepka, Mary Jo MD, MSPH*; Weisbord, Joanna S. MSW, MPH†; Zhang, Guoyan MD, MPH*; Brewer, Toye MD‡

Sexually Transmitted Diseases:
Article
Abstract

Background and Objectives: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a sexually transmitted infection that can be prevented with hepatitis B vaccination.

Goal: The goal was to determine prevalence and risk factors for HBV infection and immunity among sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic clients.

Study Design: In this cross-sectional study, consenting adult STD clinic clients were interviewed regarding HBV risk factors and vaccination history, and blood was drawn for HBV serologic testing.

Results: Of the 682 participants, 154 (22.6%) had antibody to hepatitis B core antigen, indicating previous infection, and 64 (9.4%) had only antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen, indicating immunity as a result of hepatitis B vaccination. Only 130 (19.1%) of all participants reported receiving at least one dose of hepatitis B vaccine.

Conclusion: The majority of clients were susceptible to HBV, were at high risk for HBV infection, and would benefit from hepatitis B vaccination.

In Brief

A study of sexually transmitted disease clinic clients in Miami, Florida, found that most clients were susceptible to hepatitis B virus, were at high risk for hepatitis B virus infection and would benefit from hepatitis B vaccination.

Author Information

*Office of Epidemiology and Disease Control, Miami-Dade County Health Department, Miami, Florida; CDC Public Health Prevention Specialist assigned to Office of Epidemiology and Disease Control, Miami-Dade County Health Department, Miami, Florida; and the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida

Mary Jo Trepka has a new affiliation since completing this study: Department of Public Health, Florida International University, Miami, Florida. Joanna Weisbord also has a new affiliation: Boston Medical Center, Section of General Internal Medicine, Research Unit, Boston, Massachusetts.

This study was funded by the Florida Department of Health. The authors thank the following persons for their contributions to this study: Indra Pandya-Smith, MPH, Dolly Katz, PhD, Sterling Whisenhunt, Maria Nunez, MPH, Patrick Joseph, MPH, Sharmista Dutta, MPH, Katiana Pierre, Anita Martinez, RN, Ilsis Munoz, and Pedro Móntes de Oca from the Florida Department of Health; and David McNeely, MPH, Jose Rossique, MD, Jose Puerto, PA, Maria Inez Oliveira, ARNP, and Gabriele Cohen, ARNP, from the University of Miami.

Correspondence: Mary Jo Trepka, MD, MSPH, Department of Public Health, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th Street, VH 216F, Miami, FL 33199. E-mail: trepkam@fiu.edu

Received for publication April 28, 2003,

revised July 16, 2003, and accepted July 21, 2003.

© Copyright 2003 American Sexually Transmitted Diseases Association