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Failure of Autologous Chondrocyte Implantation

Andriolo, Luca MD; Merli, Giulia BScD; Filardo, Giuseppe MD, PhD; Marcacci, Maurilio MD; Kon, Elizaveta MD

Sports Medicine and Arthroscopy Review: March 2017 - Volume 25 - Issue 1 - p 10–18
doi: 10.1097/JSA.0000000000000137
Review Articles

Long-term results of autologous chondrocyte implantation and matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation in the knee are satisfying, but not enough attention has been paid to the evaluation of failures. Thus, a systematic review of the literature was performed, underlining a failure rate in the 58 included articles of 14.9% among 4294 patients, most of them occurring in the first 5 years after surgery, and with no difference between autologous chondrocyte implantation and matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation. Failures are very heterogenously defined in the current literature. A widely accepted definition is needed, and a comprehensive definition taking into consideration the patient’s perception of the outcome, not just the surgeon’s or researcher’s point of view, would be advisable. Finally, there is no agreement on the most appropriate treatment of failures, and further studies are needed to give better indications to properly manage patients failed after cartilage procedures.

Level of Evidence: Level IV.

Nano-Biotechnology Laboratory

*I Orthopaedic and Traumatologic Clinic Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Bologna, Italy

Disclosure: E.K. is consultant for CartiHeal (2009) Ltd (Israel) and has stocks of CartiHeal (2009) Ltd (Israel). She is consultant and receives institutional support from Finceramica Faenza Spa (Italy). She receives institutional support from Fidia Farmaceutici Spa (Italy), IGEA Clinical Biophysics (Italy), Zimmer Biomet (Warsaw, Indiana), and Kensey Nash (Exton, Pennsylvania). G.F. is consultant and receives institutional support from: Finceramica Faenza Spa (Italy), Fidia Farmaceutici Spa (Italy), CartiHeal (2009) Ltd (Israel). He is consultant for: EON Medica SRL (Italy). He receives Institutional Support from: IGEA Clinical Biophysics (Italy), Zimmer Biomet (Warsaw, Indiana), and Kensey Nash (Exton, Pennsylvania). M.M. receives royalties and research institutional support from Finceramica Faenza Spa (Italy). He receives institutional support from: Fidia Farmaceutici Spa (Italy), CartiHeal (2009) Ltd (Israel), IGEA Clinical Biophysics (Italy), Zimmer Biomet (Warsaw, Indiana), and Kensey Nash (Exton, Pennsylvania). The other authors declare no conflict of interest.

Reprints: Giulia Merli, BScD, Nano-Biotechnology Laboratory, Rizzoli Orthopaedic Institute, Via Di Barbiano,1/10, 40136 Bologna, Italy

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