Selected High Impact Articles

Creator:   Adam Pearson, MD, MS
Created:   11/9/2011
Contains:  10 items
This collection includes the highest impact articles that have been published in Spine, across all topic areas.

Surgical Versus Nonoperative Treatment for Lumbar Disc Herniation: Four-Year Results for the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT)

Weinstein, James N.; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; More

Spine. 33(25):2789-2800, December 1, 2008.

The SPORT study demonstrated that while both surgical and nonoperative treatment resulted in improvements, lumbar disc herniation patients improved more with surgery, and this benefit persisted out to four years.

Surgical Versus Nonoperative Treatment for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Four-Year Results of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial

Weinstein, James N.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Lurie, Jon D.; More

Spine. 35(14):1329-1338, June 15, 2010.

This SPORT study demonstrated a significant benefit from surgery for spinal stenosis compared to nonoperative treatment that persisted out to four years.

United States Trends in Lumbar Fusion Surgery for Degenerative Conditions

Deyo, Richard A.; Gray, Darryl T.; Kreuter, William; More

Spine. 30(12):1441-1445, June 15, 2005.

This database study utilized the Nationwide Inpatient Sample and documented the rapid rise in the use of lumbar fusion in the 1990s.

Radiosurgery for Spinal Metastases: Clinical Experience in 500 Cases From a Single Institution

Gerszten, Peter C.; Burton, Steven A.; Ozhasoglu, Cihat; More

Spine. 32(2):193-199, January 15, 2007.

This article demonstrated the safety and efficacy of single-fraction, targeted radiosurgery for spinal metastases.

The Impact of Positive Sagittal Balance in Adult Spinal Deformity

Glassman, Steven D.; Bridwell, Keith; Dimar, John R.; More

Spine. 30(18):2024-2029, September 15, 2005.

This article is one of the first that drew attention to the importance of sagittal balance in adult deformity patients.

Long-Term Outcomes of Surgical and Nonsurgical Management of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: 8 to 10 Year Results from the Maine Lumbar Spine Study

Atlas, Steven J.; Keller, Robert B.; Wu, Yen A.; More

Spine. 30(8):936-943, April 15, 2005.

This report from the Maine Lumbar Spine Study demonstrated that while many outcomes were no longer different in spinal stenosis patients treated surgically or nonoperatively at ten years, surgery patients still reported better leg pain outcomes and more improvement on the Roland disability scale at long-term follow-up.

Long-Term Outcomes of Surgical and Nonsurgical Management of Sciatica Secondary to a Lumbar Disc Herniation: 10 Year Results from the Maine Lumbar Spine Study

Atlas, Steven J.; Keller, Robert B.; Wu, Yen A.; More

Spine. 30(8):927-935, April 15, 2005.

This report from the Maine Lumbar Spine Study demonstrated that disc herniation patients treated with discectomy had more improvement of their leg pain and Roland disability score compared to those treated nonoperatively out to ten years.

A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial: Intradiscal Electrothermal Therapy Versus Placebo for the Treatment of Chronic Discogenic Low Back Pain

Freeman, Brian J. C.; Fraser, Robert D.; Cain, Christopher M. J.; More

Spine. 30(21):2369-2377, November 1, 2005.

This double-blind RCT comparing intradiscal electrothermal therapy (IDET) to placebo demonstrated no benefit from IDET for chronic discogenic low back pain.

A Revised Scoring System for Preoperative Evaluation of Metastatic Spine Tumor Prognosis

Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Matsuzaki, Hiromi; Oda, Hiroshi; More

Spine. 30(19):2186-2191, October 1, 2005.

This article describes a classification system to predict survival from spinal metastatic disease that can be used to guide decision-making in this population.

A New Classification of Thoracolumbar Injuries: The Importance of Injury Morphology, the Integrity of the Posterior Ligamentous Complex, and Neurologic Status

Vaccaro, Alexander R.; Lehman, Ronald A. Jr; Hurlbert, R John; More

Spine. 30(20):2325-2333, October 15, 2005.

This article describes a classification system for thoracolumbar fractures designed to guide treatment based on injury morphology, integrity of the posterior longitudinal complex, and neurological status of the patient.