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Lumbar Scoliosis in Postmenopausal Women: Prevalence and Relationship With Bone Density, Age, and Body Mass Index

Urrutia, Julio MD*; Diaz-Ledezma, Claudio MD; Espinosa, Julio MD*; Berven, Sigurd H. MD

Spine:
doi: 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181db7456
Deformity
Abstract

Study Design. Cross-sectional study.

Objective. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of lumbar scoliosis in postmenopausal women aged 50 years and older, and to determine the association of adult lumbar scoliosis with age, osteoporosis, and body mass index (BMI).

Summary of Background Data. Adult scoliosis prevalence has not been clearly determined. In addition, limited data are available on the correlation of adult scoliosis with age, bone mineral density, and BMI.

Methods. We studied 380 postmenopausal women aged 50 years and older, who were evaluated with dual-energy radiograph absorptiometry (DXA) scan images. The lumbar curvature magnitude in the coronal plane was measured in DXA images with Cobb's method. Scoliosis was defined by the presence of a curvature 10° or larger. Age and T-score in the lumbar spine and in both femoral necks were recorded, and BMI was calculated. Correlation analysis among the studied variables was performed, as well as a linear regression analysis to determine the effect of femoral neck T-score, spine T-score, age, and BMI as independent predictors of the Cobb angle in the lumbar spine.

Results. The prevalence of lumbar scoliosis was 12.9% (49 cases); 43 cases (11.3%) had lumbar curves 10° or more but less than 20°, and six cases (1.6%) had lumbar curves more than 20°. Age and BMI were independent predictors of the Cobb angle; the femoral neck T-score and the lumbar T-score were not independent predictors of the Cobb angle.

Conclusion. We found a 12.9% prevalence of lumbar scoliosis in postmenopausal women aged 50 years and older, most of them with mild curves. Age and BMI are independent predictors of lumbar scoliosis. Bone mineral density (BMD) is not an independent predictor of the magnitude of the curve.

In Brief

We studied the prevalence of lumbar scoliosis in women aged 50 years and older. We investigated the association of adult lumbar scoliosis with age, osteoporosis, and body mass index. The prevalence of scoliosis was 12.9%.

Author Information

*Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Santiago, Chile

Universidad del Desarrollo, Santiago, Chile

Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California, San Francisco, CA.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Julio Urrutia, MD, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Pontifi cia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Marcoleta 352, Santiago, Chile; E-mail: jurrutia@med.puc.cl

Acknowledgment date: September 11, 2009. First revision date: December 23, 2009. Second revision date: February 19, 2010. Accepted date: March 1, 2010.

The manuscript submitted does not contain information about medical device(s)/drug(s). No funds were received in support of this work. No benefits in any form have been or will be received from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this manuscript.

© 2011 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.