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Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Clinimetric Property of Korean Version of the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory-42 in Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain

Ko, Young-Mi MPH*; Park, Won-Beom MD, PhD†; Lim, Jae-Young MD, PhD‡

doi: 10.1097/BRS.0b013e3181ba7a78
Health Services Research

Study Design. Validation of a translated, culturally adapted questionnaire.

Objective. We developed a Korean version of the Chronic Pain Coping Inventory-42 (CPCI-42) by performing a cross-cultural adaptation, and evaluated its reliability and validity.

Summary of Background Data. The CPCI is widely used and validated instruments for measuring coping strategies in chronic pain. However, no validated and culturally adapted version was available in Asian countries.

Methods. We assessed 142 patients with chronic low back pain using the CPCI-42 and measures of physical disability, pain, and quality of life. Results for 93 of the 142 patients exhibited test-retest reliability. The interval time of collecting retest data varied from 2 weeks to 1 month. Criterion validity was evaluated using correlations between the CPCI-42 and the Oswestry Disability Index, the Brief Pain Inventory, and the Short Form 36-item Health Survey (version 2.0). Construct validity was computed using exploratory factor analysis.

Results. The Korean version of the CPCI-42 had a high internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha >0.70) with the exception of results for task persistence and relaxation. Illness-focused coping (guarding, resting, asking for assistance) and other-focused coping (seeking social support) were most significantly correlated with Oswestry Disability Index, Brief Pain Inventory, and Short Form 36-item Health Survey, respectively. Outcomes for task persistence were contrary to other subscales in wellness-focused coping. Construct validity by factor analysis produced similar results to the original CPCI subscale. However, several factors showed cross-loading in 8 factor solutions.

Conclusion. Despite linguistic and cultural differences, the Korean version of the CPCI-42 is overall a meaningful tool, and produces results sufficiently similar to the original CPCI-42.

We developed a Korean version of Chronic Pain Coping Inventory-42 by performing a cross-cultural adaptation, and evaluated its reliability and validity in patients with chronic low back pain. Despite linguistic and cultural differences, this is overall a meaningful tool, and produces results sufficiently similar to a original form.

From the *Dongguk University-Seoul, Seoul, Korea; †Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Incheon Sarang Hospital, Incheon, Korea; and ‡Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul, Korea.

Acknowledgment date: June 25, 2008. Revision date: June 15, 2009. Acceptance date: June 16, 2009.

The manuscript submitted does not contain information about medical device(s)/drug(s).

No funds were received in support of this work. Although one or more of the author(s) has/have received or will receive benefits for personal or professional use from a commercial party related directly or indirectly to the subject of this manuscript, benefits will be directed solely to a research fund, foundation, educational institution, or other nonprofit organization which the author(s) has/have been associated.

Address correspondence and reprint requests to Jae-Young Lim, MD, PhD, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, 300, Gumi-dong, Bundang-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea; E-mail: drlim1@snu.ac.kr

© 2010 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.