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Simulation in Healthcare: The Journal of the Society for Simulation in Healthcare:
Abstracts: Abstracts Presented at the 6th Annual International Meeting on Medical Simulation: ABSTRACT # 1474 - POSTER BOARD # 93

The Value of Using the TraumaMan ® Simulator to Teach Chest Drain Insertion During the ATLS Course

Berkenstadt, Haim1,3; Munz, Yaron1; Blumenfeld, Amir2; Trodler, Gregory3; Ziv, Amitai1

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1The Israel Center for Medical Simulation (M.S.R), Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel, 2IDF Medical Corps, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive care, Sheba Medical Center, Tel Hashomer, Israel

Editor’s Note: FULL ABSTRACTS are arranged numerically by the Abstract #. Refer to the Abstract Listing Pages for the Abstract # that corresponds to the - POSTER BOARD #. Abstracts are presented as they were submitted except for minor formatting.

Conflict of Interest statements located at the bottom of each abstract.

Abstract publication made possible in part under contract W81XWH-06-0282, Telemedicine and Advanced Technology Research Center.

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Background:

The Trauma-Man® simulator (Simulab, USA) was announced by the American College of Surgeons as a legitimate alternative to the ATLS animal surgical skill station. The aim of this study was to assess the value of using the simulator to teach chest drain insertion during the ATLS course by acquiring experts’ and trainees opinions.

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Methods:

Following chest drain insertion to the TraumaMan simulator, 24 experienced ATLS instructors (5 cardio-thoracic surgeons, 14 general surgeons experienced in trauma management and 6 anesthesiologists) completed a subjective questionnaire. Questionnaires were also used for assessment by 42 novice participants of the ATLS course trained with both animal skills laboratory and the simulator.

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Results:

Median scores on a scale of 1 to 6 (1 indicates “not similar at all” and 6 indicates “identical”) given by the experienced physicians to the various steps required for chest drain insertion were: anatomical landmarks - 5, tactility of the skin -4, skin incision-4, dissection of tissues-4, identification of the pleural space-5, tube insertion to the pleural space-5, and chest drain fixation -5. Trainees of the ATLS course asked to comment on the ability of the model to teach these steps of the procedure, gave median scores of: anatomical landmarks - 5, tactility of the skin -5, skin incision-5, dissection of tissues-4, identification of the pleural space-5, tube insertion to the pleural space-5, and chest drain fixation -5. The trainees found the TraumaMan superior to the animal model in representing the anatomical landmarks, and inferior in the dissection of tissues.

Experts recommended the simulator to be used to train novice physicians in chest drain insertion (5.5±0.8, in a scale of 1–6, 1 indicates “not able at all” and 6 indicates “very useful”). However, changes aiming to improve the representation of the “safe triangle” of chest drain insertion were recommended. In the current version of the simulator, part of the area designated for chest tube insertion is outside the triangle.

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Conclusion:

The Trauma-Man simulator was recommended as a training tool for chest drain insertion by both ATLS experienced instructors and novice trainees. Further improvements in the model were recommended.

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Conflict of Interest:

Authors indicated they have nothing to disclose.

© 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

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