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LEAKING CHOROIDAL NEVUS TREATED WITH FOCAL LASER PHOTOCOAGULATION

Goldman, Darin R. MD*,†; Barnes, Alexander C. BS; Vora, Robin A. MD*; Duker, Jay S. MD*

RETINAL Cases & Brief Reports:
doi: 10.1097/ICB.0000000000000024
Case Report
Abstract

Purpose: To present a case of leaky choroidal nevus that responded favorably to treatment with focal laser photocoagulation, shown by spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and fundus photography.

Methods: Descriptive case report of a 40-year-old male patient with decreased visual acuity because of subretinal fluid associated with a choroidal nevus, which was treated with focal laser photocoagulation.

Results: Treatment with focal laser photocoagulation to the surface of the choroidal nevus resulted in the resolution of subretinal fluid by 6 weeks. The therapeutic effect remained after 1 year of follow-up with continued improvement in vision and with no growth of the lesion.

Conclusion: Laser photocoagulation can be an effective treatment for symptomatic subretinal fluid associated with a choroidal nevus. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography, fundus autofluorescence, and fundus photography can be helpful in monitoring the treatment response.

In Brief

This report describes the clinical course of a patient with decreased visual acuity because of subretinal fluid associated with a choroidal nevus that responded to focal laser photocoagulation treatment. Therapeutic response was monitored by spectral domain optical coherence tomography and fundus photography.

Author Information

*New England Eye Center at Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts;

Ophthalmic Consultants of Boston, Boston, Massachusetts; and

Tuft University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts.

Reprint requests: Jay S Duker, MD, New England Eye Center at Tufts Medical Center, 800 Washington Street, Box 450, Boston, MA 02111; e-mail: jduker@tuftsmedicalcenter.org

Supported in part by both Research to Prevent Blindness and Massachusetts Lions Eye Research Fund unrestricted award to the New England Eye Center/Department of Ophthalmology, Tufts University School of Medicine.

None of the authors have any conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2014 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.