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OCULAR INJURIES WITH A METALLIC FOREIGN BODY IN THE POSTERIOR SEGMENT AS A RESULT OF HAMMERING: The Visual Outcome and Prognostic Factors

Valmaggia, Christophe MD*; Baty, Florent MD; Lang, Corina MD*; Helbig, Horst MD

Retina:
doi: 10.1097/IAE.0000000000000062
Original Study
Abstract

Purpose: To evaluate the evolution of the best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), to determine the prognostic factors, and to analyze the efficiency of the surgical procedures in the cases of ocular injuries caused by a metallic intraocular foreign body retained in the posterior segment as a result of hammering.

Methods: A retrospective review of 64 consecutive patients was conducted at the Cantonal Hospital St Gallen over a 15-year period. The pre-, intra-, and postoperative clinical parameters were assessed. The statistics were performed using Fisher's exact test and a multiple correspondence analysis.

Results: The mean initial BCVA was 20/138 (standard deviation, 20/112). The mean ocular trauma score was 3.03 (standard deviation, 0.83). In all cases, the removal of the intraocular foreign body was performed within 24 hours after the injury. In 45 patients (70.3%), further operations were performed during the mean follow-up of 54.4 months (standard deviation, 22.7 months). The mean final BCVA was 20/39 (standard deviation, 20/55). In 53 patients (82.8%), the final BCVA was 20/40 or more. In 8 patients (12.5%), the final BCVA was 20/200 or less because of a direct macular lesion caused by the intraocular foreign body (P < 0.001).

Conclusion: Thanks to the improvement in the surgical procedures, the ocular injuries with a metallic intraocular foreign body in the posterior segment as a result of hammering have a good visual outcome unless the macula is involved.

In Brief

The ocular injuries with a metallic foreign body retained in the posterior segment as a result of hammering metal on metal have a good visual outcome unless the macula is involved.

Author Information

*Clinic of Ophthalmology; and

Clinic Unit Trial, Cantonal Hospital St Gallen, St Gallen, Switzerland; and

Clinic of Ophthalmology, University of Regensburg, Regensburg, Germany.

Reprint requests: Christophe Valmaggia, MD, Clinic of Ophthalmology, Cantonal Hospital, St Gallen, Switzerland, CH-9007 e-mail: christophe.valmaggia@kssg.ch

None of the authors have any financial/conflicting interests to disclose.

© 2014 by Ophthalmic Communications Society, Inc.